German History, 1770-1866

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 1993 - Foreign Language Study - 969 pages
0 Reviews
This volume in the Oxford History of Modern Europe is a comprehensive study of German history from 1770 to 1866. It examines the manner in which the development of bureaucratic and participatory institutions changed the character and capacities of governments throughout German Europe; the economic expansion in which the productivity of both agriculture and manufacturing increased, commercial activity intensified, and urban growth was encouraged; and the rising culture of print, which sustained new developments in literature, philosophy, and scholarship, and helped transform the rules and procedures of everyday life. These developments, it is argued, led to an erosion of the traditional values and institutions, and played an important part in the transformation of German politics, society, and culture. Rather than viewing the development of a Prussian-led Nation State as "natural" or inevitable, the book emphasizes alternative forces of unity and division which existed up until the Austro-Prussian War of 1866.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

EIGHTEENTHCENTURY POLITICS 1
11
The Holy Roman Empire 1213
12
EIGHTEENTHCENTURY SOCIETY
72
EIGHTEENTHCENTURY CULTURE
144
Central Europe in 1806
254
CULTURE IN THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA
324
RESTORATION POLITICS 18151830
391
Central Europe in 1815
394
THE CULTURAL ESTABLISHMENT AND
524
THE GROWTH OF PARTICIPATORY POLITICS
588
SOCIETY IN THE AGE OF THE BURGERTUM
730
CULTURE IN THE AGE OF THE BURGERTUM
793
POLITICAL OPPORTUNITIES AND ALTERNATIVES
853
CONCLUSION
912
GUIDE TO FURTHER READING
918
Copyright

GROWTH AND STAGNATION IN GERMAN
451

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

James J. Sheehan is at Stanford University.

Bibliographic information