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ADAPTED TO 280 POPULAR AND USEFUL TUNES, ANCIENT AND MODERN.

FOR USE IN public worship, and thE FAMILY OR SOCIAL CIRCLE.

REVISED EDITION.

BY

G. S. STEVENS AND W. McDONALD.

BOSTON:

JAMES P. MAGEE, 5 CORNHILL.
HENRY V. DEGEN, 49 CORNHILL.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1860, by G.
in the Clerk's Office of the District of Rhode Island.

STEVENS and WM. McDONALD,

M

2121 .577 1862

PREFACE.

IN preparing a new edition of this work, no pains have been spared to make it accurate and complete. Several tunes have been omitted and new ones inserted, which we believe are preferable. The book it is hoped contains a sufficient variety of Hymns for all occasions of public and social worship.

A large number of the Hymns are found in the Methodist Hymn Book, and such, for the sake of convenience, are correspondingly numbered.

There will frequent! be found, at each opening of the book, two tunes, either of which is adapted to all the Hymns upon the two pages. Commonly, one of these is a well-known tune, and the other, one which is less familiar, but equally valuable and pleasing, with some exceptions, perhaps, when once learned.

We have made special arrangements with Dr. Lowell Mason, to use all the tunes of his composition, which might be desired.

We take pleasure in acknowledging our special obligations to Mr. F. J. Huntington, Publisher, for permission to use some of I. B. Woodbury's excellent tunes, from the "Day Spring '-a book deservedly popular, and worthy of the man whose compositions enrich its pages, and whose death is lamented by all lovers of song. Also, to Mr. F. A. Brown & Co, Publishers of the "American Vocalist," (one of the most popular music books ever published in New England,) for permission to use some of the compositions of our lamented friend, Rev. D. H. Mansfield. Also, to Prof. W. B. Bradbury, for some of his best compositions. To Dr. T. Hastings, L. O. Emerson, L. T. Downes, V. C. Taylor, O. Ditson, S. Hubbard, C. W. Beames, G. F. Root, Rev. W. H. Oakley, Rev. J. W. Dadmun, Rev. W. F. Farrington, Rev. E. W. Dunbar, and others, for valuable original compositions and arrangements.

The Chorals, with which these pages are enriched, were suggested by Eben Tourjee, Professor of Music in the Providence Conference Seminary and Musical Institute.

Due credit has been given for all Hymns and Tunes, the authorship of which is known.

The method of using this book cannot be better expressed than in the following language, from the Preface of the Sabbath Hymn and Tune Book:

As we have already remarked, Congregational singing may be led by a Choir. It may be led by a Precentor; yet he, if he is truly interested in his work, and if he sustain a proper relation to the congregation, would almost immediately gather around him a few aiding voices. In either case the accompaniment of an Organ, Organ Harmonium, or Melodeon, will be important. The choir, who lead, must be content to sing in a plain, simple manner, without any attempt at artistic effect. They should avoid every thing which tends to confuse the congregation or to discourage the general participation in the song; and they should furnish a full volume of sound with which the people can readily unite. It is better that all should sing the melody, at least until the congregation become very thoroughly acquainted with it, and, under all circumstances, it is important that this part should be well sustained by men's voices. The singing of the four different parts is in fact singing four different tunes, and this causes confusion to those who have made little musical proficiency. These remarks may apply, also, in part at least, to the manner of playing the organ, which should have for its constant object the assisting of the people, all the people, in their song, and should avoid every thing having a tendency to mislead or confuse them.

Tunes should be used with which the congregation are familiar. New tunes may be introduced, one at a time, with more or less frequency, according to the facility with which the people learn them. The same tunes should be frequently repeated, since familiarity with the tune is necessary to any high degree of religious influence in the singing exercise. It is not

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