Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

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Harper Collins, Sep 30, 2008 - Psychology - 448 pages

"The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called 'yourself.'"

One of the most important and influential books of the past half-century, Robert M. Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is a powerful, moving, and penetrating examination of how we live and a meditation on how to live better. The narrative of a father on a summer motorcycle trip across America's Northwest with his young son, it becomes a profound personal and philosophical odyssey into life's fundamental questions. A true modern classic, it remains at once touching and transcendent, resonant with the myriad confusions of existence and the small, essential triumphs that propel us forward.

 

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User Review  - ashishg - www.librarything.com

I tried to like this book. I gave up in 20 pages first time around, and trudged along to 100 second time, before deciding to not force myself to waste any more time. It's not a bad book, and ... Read full review

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User Review  - patl - www.librarything.com

I read it in college. I hated the philosophy parts, but the motorcycle travel parts were my thing for sure. Maybe it would be better on a read when I'm a bit older now, but I doubt I'll go back to it. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
xi
Section 2
11
Section 3
97
Section 4
112
Section 5
119
Section 6
137
Section 7
154
Section 8
187
Section 13
259
Section 14
274
Section 15
289
Section 16
300
Section 17
329
Section 18
331
Section 19
353
Section 20
399

Section 9
202
Section 10
212
Section 11
226
Section 12
241
Section 21
413
Section 22
419
Section 23
442
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Robert M. Pirsig was born in 1928 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He studied chemistry and philosophy (B.A., 1950) and journalism (M.A., 1958) at the University of Minnesota, pursued graduate work in philosophy at the University of Chicago, and attended Benares Hindu University in India, where he studied Oriental philosophy. He is also the author of a sequel to this book, Lila.

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