The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

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Luce, 1908 - 325 pages
 

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The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

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Initially released in 1908, Mencken's study of Nietzsche, which was the first of its kind in English, was his second book. This reprint is based on the text of the 1913 third edition and includes a ... Read full review

Review: The Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche

User Review  - Niels Jensen - Goodreads

Well-written. A good place to start if you are curious about Nietzsche. Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
16
IV
27
V
40
VI
50
VII
61
VIII
63
IX
74
XV
162
XVI
174
XVII
192
XVIII
208
XIX
216
XX
226
XXI
242
XXII
253

X
88
XI
100
XII
117
XIII
126
XIV
147

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Page 269 - I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life, the life of toil and effort, of labor and strife; to preach that highest form of success which comes, not to the man who desires mere easy peace, but to the man who does not shrink from danger, from hardship, or from bitter toil, and who out of these wins the splendid ultimate triumph.
Page 78 - Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his man-servant, nor his maid-servant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbor's.
Page 122 - American's conviction that he must be able to look any man in the eye and tell him to go to hell, are the very essence of the free man's way of life.
Page 128 - These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are particularly and unchangeably designed ; and their number is so certain and definite, that it cannot be either increased or diminished.
Page 269 - China has already found, that in this world the nation that has trained itself to a career of unwarlike and isolated ease is bound in the end to go down before other nations which have not lost the manly and adventurous qualities.
Page 81 - evil" is of a different origin. The cowardly, the timid, the insignificant, and those thinking merely of narrow utility are despised; moreover, also, the distrustful, with their constrained glances, the self-abasing, the dog-like kind of men who let themselves be abused, the mendicant flatterers, and above all the liars:— it is a fundamental belief of all aristocrats that the common people are untruthful. "We truthful ones"— the nobility in ancient Greece called themselves.
Page 202 - He who can command, he who is a master by "nature," he who comes on the scene forceful in deed and gesture— what has he to do with contracts? Such beings defy calculation, they come like fate, without cause, reason, notice, excuse, they are there as the lightning is there, too terrible, too sudden, too convincing, too "different,
Page 167 - Ye say it is the good cause which halloweth even war? I say unto you: it is the good war which halloweth every cause. War and courage have done more great things than charity.
Page 329 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...
Page 234 - The man who has become free - and how much more the mind that has become free - spurns the contemptible sort of well-being dreamed of by shopkeepers, Christians, cows, women, Englishmen and other democrats. The free man is a warrior.

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