The Cabinet Portrait Gallery of British Worthies..

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Charles Knight & Company, 1846 - Authors
 

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Page 18 - Heaven lies about us in our infancy ! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But he beholds the light, and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended ; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.
Page 88 - Others apart sat on a hill retired, In thoughts more elevate, and reasoned high Of providence, foreknowledge, will, and fate, Fixed fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute, 560 And found no end, in wandering mazes lost.
Page 76 - Civitas) which is but an artificial man, though of greater stature and strength than the natural, for whose protection and defence it was intended; and in which the sovereignty is an artificial soul, as giving life and motion to the whole body...
Page 44 - An Account of the Growth of Popery and arbitrary Government in England...
Page 50 - He cast (of which we rather boast) The Gospel's pearl upon our coast, And in these rocks for us did frame A temple where to sound His name. Oh ! let our voice His praise exalt, Till it arrive at Heaven's vault, Which, thence (perhaps) rebounding, may Echo beyond the Mexique Bay.
Page 138 - Let not our veneration for Milton forbid us to look with some degree of merriment on great promises and small performance, on the man who hastens home, because his countrymen are contending for their liberty, and, when he reaches the scene of action, vapours away his patriotism in a private boarding-school.
Page 75 - A PISGAH SIGHT OF PALESTINE, AND THE CONFINES THEREOF; WITH THE HISTORY OF THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT ACTED THEREON.
Page 75 - Nature, the art whereby God hath made and governs the world, is by the art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an artificial animal.
Page 37 - Town-Bayes writes all the while and spells, And, like a pack-horse, tires without his bells. Their fancies like our bushy points appear ; The poets tag them, we for fashion wear. I too, transported by the mode, offend, And, while I meant to praise thee, must commend. Thy verse, created, like thy theme sublime, In number, weight, and measure, needs 'not rime.
Page 50 - And sends the fowls to us in care On daily visits through the air. He hangs in shades the orange bright...

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