Undercover: Police Surveillance in Comparative Perspective

Front Cover
C. J. C. F. Fijnaut, Gary Trade Marx
Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Oct 12, 1995 - Law - 337 pages
The United States and Europe have recently experienced a significant expansion in the use of undercover police tactics and technological means of surveillance. In a democratic society, such tactics raise significant questions for public policy and social research. New and sophisticated forms of crime and social control (and their internationalization) represent an important and neglected topic. Realizing this, the leading scholars in this field created a European and American working group for the comparative study of police surveillance. This collaborative, landmark volume reports the results of their work. It is the first book ever devoted to the comparative study of the topic and includes articles on the historical development of covert policing in Europe and its spread to the United States (where it was extended and recently exported back to Europe), plus detailed accounts of the use of covert tactics in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Iceland, Sweden, Canada and the United States. "Audience: " Social scientists, historians, policy makers, lawyers, and criminal justice practitioners.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Cyrille Fijnaut and Gary T Marx
1
Justifying Whitecollar Undercover Work
6
Undercover Returns to Europe
15
Heiner Busch and Albrecht Funk
17
Louise Shelley
21
ELEMENTS FOR DESCRIPTION
29
The Other Police Agencies
42
References
50
Some Examples
220
Some Additional Consequences
228
Examples of Covert Policing Practices
243
Ethan A Nadelmann THE DEA IN EUROPE
269
Undercover Operations
275
Controlled Deliveries
284
Wiretapping
286
Conclusion
287

UNDERCOVER TACTICS AS AN ELEMENT OF PREVENTIVE CRIME FIGHTING
55
The Effects of Preventive Crime Fighting on the Criminal Justice
62
References
68
References
99
The Criminal Intelligence Department
107
Infiltration
115
Surveillance
127
Secrecy and the Fear of Corruption
133
Lode Van Outrive and Jan Cappelle
141
Police Provocation and its Legalization
147
SOVIET UNDERCOVER WORK
155
The Militia and Undercover Work
161
PostSoviet Developments
170
The Inheritance of Covert Policing
176
Paying for Admission
183
Conclusion
190
The Contexts of Police Undercover Work
201
Nikos Passas and Richard B Groskin INTERNATIONAL UNDERCOVER INVESTIGATIONS
291
Operation CChase
293
Operation Exodus
294
Preparing International Operations
296
Coordination with Domestic Agencies
299
Coordination and Collaboration with Foreign Agencies
301
Diversity of Methods and Procedures
302
Diversity of Substantive Laws
303
Other Political Considerations
304
Timing the Closedown of Undercover Operations
306
Conclusion
307
References
309
SOME IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY
313
SOME IMPLICATIONS FOR KNOWLEDGE AND SOCIAL RESEARCH
323
References
337
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information