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" ... and it can seldom happen but he that understands himself, might convey his notions to another, if, content to be understood, he did not seek to be admired; but when once he begins to contrive how his sentiments may be received, not with most ease... "
The Works of Samuel Johnson - Page 143
by Samuel Johnson - 1810
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The Beauties of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Consisting of Maxims and Observations ...

Samuel Johnson - 1804 - 394 pages
...sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, be then transfers his consideration from words to sounds,...he grows more elegant, becomes less intelligible. Idler, vol. i, p. *oz. AGRICULTURE. Nothing can more fully prove the ingratitude of mankind (a crime...
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The British Essayists;: Idler

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1808
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to sounds, from sentences to periods, and as he grow* more elegant becomes less intelligible. It is difficult to enumerate every species of authon...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, L. L. D.: In Twelve Volumes, Volume 7

Samuel Johnson - 1811
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...sentences, whose notions are delivered in the lump, and arc, like uncoined bullion, of more weight than use ; the liberal illustrator, who shows by examples...
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The British essayists, with prefaces by A. Chalmers, Volumes 27-28

British essayists - 1823
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...elegant becomes less intelligible. It is difficult toenumerate every species of authors whose labours counteract themselves ; the man of exuberance and...
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The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...and copiousness, who diffuses every thought through ťo many diversities of expression, that it is lost like water in a mist ; the ponderous dictator of...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1825
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...is difficult to enumerate every species of authors whese labours counteract themselves ; the man of exuberance and copiousness, who diffuses every thought...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: The Adventurer and Idler

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...as he grows more elegant becomes less intelligible. so many diversities of expression, that it is lost like water in a mist; the ponderous dictator of...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: The Adventurer and Idler

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...as he grows more elegant becomes less intelligible. so many diversities of expression, that it is lost like water in a mist ; the ponderous dictator of...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 103, Part 1; Volume 153

Early English newspapers - 1833
...when he exposes the terrific diction in No. 36 of the same work. He says, " Every thought is diffused through so many diversities of expression, that it is lost like water in a mist." Of the latter fault take the following example. It is in her first volume. " The social powers of pleasing...
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Gems of genius; or, Words of the wise: a collection of the most pointed ...

Andrew Steinmetz - 1838
...his sentiments may be received, not with most ease to his reader, but with most advantage to himself, he then transfers his consideration from words to...grows more elegant, becomes less intelligible.— Ib. 294. Of nations as of individuals, the first blessing is independence ; neither the man nor the...
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