Medieval Norwich

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Carole Rawcliffe, Richard Wilson
A&C Black, Oct 1, 2006 - History - 460 pages
Throughout the middle ages, Norwich was one of the most populous and celebrated cities in England. Dominated by its castle and cathedral priory, it was the centre of government power in East Anglia, as well as an important trading entrepot. With records dating back to Anglo-Saxon times, and many buildings surviving from the middle ages, the history of medieval Norwich is an exceptionally rich one. "Medieval Norwich" is an account of the growth of the city, with its walls, streams, markets, hospitals and churches, and the lives of its citizens. It traces activities and beliefs, as well as the tensions lying not far beneath the surface that eventually erupted in Kett's Rebellion of 1549.
 

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Contents

I
xix
II
xxxix
III
29
IV
49
V
73
VI
121
VII
137
VIII
157
IX
189
X
213
XI
235
XII
255
XIII
277
XIV
301
Copyright

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Page xv - F. Blomefield, An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk, 1 1 vols.

About the author (2006)

Carole Rawcliffe is Professor of Medieval History at the University of East Anglia and is author of Medicine and Society in Later Medieval England and Leprosy in Medieval England.

Richard Wilson is Emeritus Professor of Economic and Social History at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, and the author (with Alan Mackley) of Creating Paradise: The Building of the English Country House, 1660-1880.

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