Hwomely Rhymes: A Second Collection of Poems in the Dorset Dialect

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J. R. Smith, 1859 - Dialect poetry, English - 208 pages
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Page 154 - Below the beeches' bough, my love, Where you did never come, An' I don't look to meet ye now, As I do look at hwome. Since you noo mwore be at my zide, In walks in zummer het, I'll goo alwone where mist do ride, Drough trees a-drippen wet: Below the rain-wet bough, my love, Where you did never come, An' I don't grieve to miss ye now, As I do grieve at hwome.
Page 155 - Below the darksome bough, my love, Where you did never dine, An' I don't grieve to miss ye now, As I at hwome do pine. Since I do miss your va'ice an" feace In prayer at eventide, I'll pray wi' woone sad va'ice vor greace To goo where you do bide; Above the tree an' bough, my love, Where you be gone avore, An' be a-wai'ten vor me now, To come vor evermwore.
Page 147 - FALSE FRIENDS-LIKE When I wer still a bwoy, an' mother's pride, A bigger bwoy spoke up to me so kind-like, ' If you do like, I'll treat ye wi' a ride In thease wheel-barrow here.' Zoo I wer blind-like To what he had a-worken in his mind-like, An' mounted vor a passenger inside; An' comen to a puddle, perty wide, He tipp'd me in, a-grinnen back behind-like.
Page 1 - An' blow, but where the tow'r Do rise among the bricken tuns, In Blackmwore by the Stour. If you could zee their comely gait, An' pretty feaces' smiles, A-trippen on so light o...
Page 105 - When skies wer' peale wi' twinklen stars, An' whislen a'ir a-risen keen ; An' birds did leave the icy bars To vind, in woods, their mossy screen ; When vrozen grass, as white's a sheet, Did scrunchy sharp below our veet, An' water, that did sparkle red At zunzet, wer' a-vrozen dead ; The ringers then did spend an hour A-ringen changes up in tow'r ; Vor Lydlinch bells be good vor sound, An' liked by all the na'ighbours round.
Page 155 - I don't grieve to miss ye now, As I do grieve at hwome. Since now bezide my dinner-bwoard Your vaice do never sound, I'll eat the bit I can avword A-vield upon the ground ; Below the darksome bough, my love, Where you did never dine, An' I don't grieve to miss ye now, As I at hwome do pine.
Page 117 - An' when in life our love do cling The clwosest round zome single thing, We then do vind that all the rest Do wheel roun' that, vor vu'st an' best ; Zoo while our life do last, mid nought But what is good an' feair be sought, In word or deed, or heart or thought, An
Page 2 - Then let en look en out a wife In Blackmwore by the Stour. As I upon my road did pass A school-house back in May, There out upon the beaten grass Wer maidens at their play ; An' as the pretty souls did tweil An' smile, I cried, " The flow'r O' beauty, then, is still in bud In Blackmwore by the Stour.
Page 2 - An' all the farmers' housen show'd Their daughters at the door; You'd cry to bachelors at hwome — "Here, come: 'ithin an hour You 'll vind ten maidens to your mind In Blackmwore by the Stour." An' if you look'd 'ithin their door, To zee em in their pleace, A-doen housework up avore Their smilen mother's feace; You'd cry — "Why, if a man would wive An' thrive, 'ithout a dow'r, Then let en look en out a wife In Blackmwore by the Stour.
Page 206 - November's win' did blow, Wi' hufflen storms along the plain, An' blacken'd leaves did lie below The neaked tree, a-zoak'd wi...

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