Three letters on the question of regency

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J. Rackham, sold by Stockdale, and Richardson, London, 1788 - 64 pages
 

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Page 59 - Britain, should determine on the means whereby the royal assent may be given in parliament to such bill as may be passed by the two Houses of parliament, respecting the exercise of the powers and authorities of the crown, in the name and on the behalf of the king, during the continuance of his majesty's present indisposition.
Page 64 - MAYOR A Common Council holden in the Chamber of the Guildhall of the City of London...
Page 50 - I take them not upon me, but only of the due and humble obeisance that I owe to do unto the king, our most dread and sovereign lord, and to you the peerage of this land, in whom, by the occasion of the infirmity of our said sovereign lord, resteth the exercise of his authority, whose noble commandments I am as ready to perform and obey as any his...
Page 11 - ... would exercise them at present, until his arrival in the kingdom, or until he should otherwise order. The bill also provided...
Page 64 - RESOLVED, that the thanks of this court be given to the Right Hon.
Page 51 - ... whatsoever, to endeavour a change of government either in church or state, or that both Houses of Parliament, or either House of Parliament have or hath a legislative power...
Page 59 - ... his ROYAL HIGHNESS the PRINCE of WALES, the HEIR APPARENT to the Crown, and now of FULL AGE, to take upon him the care of the Civil and Military affairs of the kingdom, quRiNp his Majefty's illnefs, and no longer.
Page 58 - That it is the right and duty of the lords spiritual and temporal and commons of Great Britain now assembled, and lawfully, fully, and freely representing all the estates of the people of this realm, to provide the means of supplying the defect of the personal exercise of the royal authority...
Page 53 - Neither can the king in judgment of law, as king, ever be a minor or under age; and therefore his royal grants, and assents to acts of parliament, are good, though he has not in his natural capacity attained the legal age of twenty-one (a).
Page 63 - THE order of the day being read for taking into confideration the report from the Committee of the whole Houfe appointed to take into «mfideration the ftate of the nation...

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