The Universal Tendency to Association in Mankind Analyzed and Illustrated ...

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Houlston and Stoneman, 1840 - Associations, institutions, etc - 243 pages
 

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Page 37 - ... sovereign; or call forth all the energies of disinterested exertion for one whom they never saw, and in whose character there was nothing to esteem. In ages when the rights of the community were unfelt, this sentiment was one great preservative of society; and, though collateral or even subservient to more enlarged principles, it is still indispensable to the tranquillity and permanence of every monarchy. In a moral view, loyalty has scarcely • perhaps less tendency to refine and elevate the...
Page 38 - How high they soar'd above the crowd ! Theirs was no common party race, Jostling by dark intrigue for place ; Like fabled Gods, their mighty war Shook realms and nations in its jar ; Beneath each banner proud to stand, Look'd up the noblest of the land, Till through the British world were known The names of PITT and Fox alone.
Page 6 - When the Bees begin to work in their hives, they divide themselves into four companies : one of which roves in the fields in search of materials ; another employs itself in laying out the bottom and partitions of the cells ; a third is employed in making the inside smooth, from the corners and angles ; and the fourth company brings food for the rest, or relieves those who return with their respective burdens.
Page 214 - ... maimed by accident ; and the rest either deaf or blind. One hobbled, another hopped, a third dragged his legs after him like a wounded snake, a fourth straddled betwixt a pair of long crutches, like the mummy of a felon hanging in chains ; a fifth was bent into a horizontal position, like a mounted telescope, shoved in by a couple of chairmen ; and a sixth was the bust of a man, set upright in a wheel machine, which the waiter moved from place to place.
Page 214 - We consisted of thirteen individuals : seven lamed by the gout, rheumatism, or palsy ; three maimed by accident ; and the rest either deaf or blind. One hobbled, another hopped, a third dragged his legs after him like a wounded snake, a fourth straddled betwixt a pair of long crutches, like the mummy of a felon hanging in chains ; a fifth was bent into...
Page 37 - ... and, though collateral or even subservient to more enlarged principles, it is still indispensable to the tranquillity and permanence of every monarchy. In a moral view, loyalty has scarcely • perhaps less tendency to refine and elevate the heart than patriotism itself; and holds a middle place in the scale of human motives, as they ascend from the grosser inducements of self-interest, to the furtherance of general happiness and conformity to the purposes of Infinite Wisdom.
Page 231 - ... stability and meaning to the process. Social life, for example, is accepted as the test of value of any curriculum or method. The method of testing processes by their results has been carried over into this realm. The school is an institution designed to insure social continuity and social progress. There is a vast deal to be done in the way of embodying the new points of view in concrete form.
Page 36 - ... beneficent suzerain, against such powerful aggression, as left little prospect except of sharing in his ruin. ' From these feelings, engendered by the feudal relation, has sprung up the peculiar sentiment of personal reverence and attachment towards a sovereign, which we denominate loyalty; alike distinguishable from the stupid devotion of eastern slaves, and from the abstract respect with which free citizens regard their chief magistrate.
Page 192 - The truth is, my dear Moore, you live near the stove of society, where you are unavoidably influenced by its heat and its vapours. I did so once — and too much — and enough to give a colour to my whole future existence.

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