The Correspondence of Charles Darwin:, Volume 12; Volume 1864

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 12, 2001 - Science - 734 pages
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Volume 12 of this continuing series contains the letters to and from Charles Darwin for 1864, when Darwin, despite continuing illness, was carrying out botanical experiments and working on his book, The variation of plants and animals under domestication. The volume also sheds light on the worldwide reception of Darwin's theory, with letters from correspondents in the United States and Germany, and also on the continuing controversy in Britain, especially with the award of the Royal Society's prestigious Copley Medal to Darwin at the end of the year.

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About the author (2001)

James A. Secord has served as Director of the Darwin Correspondence Project since 2006. He is Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and a fellow of Christ's College. Besides his work for the Darwin Project, his research focuses on the history of science from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. His book, Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (2000), won the Pfizer Prize of the History of Science Society.

Charles Robert Darwin, born in 1809, was an English naturalist who founded the theory of Darwinism, the belief in evolution as determined by natural selection. Although Darwin studied medicine at Edinburgh University, and then studied at Cambridge University to become a minister, he had been interested in natural history all his life. His grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, was a noted English poet, physician, and botanist who was interested in evolutionary development. Darwin's works have had an incalculable effect on all aspects of the modern thought. Darwin's most famous and influential work, On the Origin of Species, provoked immediate controversy. Darwin's other books include Zoology of the Voyage of the Beagle, The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. Charles Darwin died in 1882.

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