The History of Glasgow

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T. D. Morison, 1881 - Glasgow (Scotland) - 547 pages
 

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Page 283 - For I was ashamed to require of the king a band of soldiers and horsemen to help us against the enemy in the way: because we had spoken unto the king, saying, The hand of our God is upon all them for good that seek him; but his power and his wrath is against all them that forsake him.
Page 129 - Renfrew, and o' the Barony, and the Gorbals, and a' about, they behoved to come into Glasgow ae fair morning to try their hand on purging the High Kirk o' Popish nicknackets. But the townsmen o...
Page 129 - Paperie — na, na ! — nane could ever say that o' the trades o' Glasgow — Sae they sune came to an agreement to take a' the idolatrous statues of sants (sorrow be on them) out o' their neuks — and sae the bits o' stane idols were broken in pieces by Scripture warrant, and flung into the Molendinar burn, and the auld kirk stood as crouse as a cat when the flaes are kaimed aff her, and a'body was alike pleased.
Page 128 - Melvil and other ministers, had condescended to demolish the cathedral, and build, with the materials thereof, some little churches in other parts, for the ease of the citizens. Divers reasons were given for it, such as the resort of superstitious people to do their devotion in that place; the huge vastness of the Church, and that the voice of a preacher could not be heard by the multitudes that convened to sermon ; the more commodious service of the people ; and the removing of that idolatrous monument...
Page 352 - ... obligations to a society than I do to the University of Glasgow. They educated me ; they sent me to Oxford. Soon after my return to Scotland, they elected me one of their own members, and afterwards preferred me to another office, to which the abilities and virtues of the never-to-be-forgotten Dr.
Page 242 - I'le superscribe it the nonsuch of Scotland, where an English florist may pick up a posie ; so that should the residue of their cities, in our northern progress, seem as barren as uncultivated fields, and every field so replenished with thistles that a flower could scarcely flourish amongst them, yet would I celebrate thy praise...
Page 241 - But this state-house, or tolbooth, is their western prodigy, infinitely excelling the model and usual built of town-halls ; and is, without exception, the paragon of beauty in the west ; whose compeer is no where to be found in the north, should you rally the rarities of all the corporations in Scotland. Here the reader (it's possible) may think I hyperbolize ; but let him not mistake himself, for I write no ambiguities : Truth stands naked in plain simplicity ; and partiality I abhor as a base imposture....
Page 84 - Melvil, who stood beside her and solemnly confirmed it. An Act of Council was then passed, declaring all the late proceedings by which Moray had become regent, treasonable and of none effect; and a bond drawn up by the nobility for the defence of their sovereign, and her restitution to her crown and kingdom, which, in the enthusiasm of the moment, was signed by nine earls, nine bishops, eighteen lords, twelve abbots and priors, and nearly one hundred barons. But the queen, though encouraged by this...
Page 128 - ... swearing, with many oaths, that he who did cast down the first stone, should be buried under it. Neither could they be pacified till the workmen were discharged by the magistrates. A complaint was hereupon made, and the principals cited before the...
Page 159 - Craftsman, for prerogative or priority; but that they, and every one of them, as one body of the common-well, shall rank and place themselves together, but distinction, as they shall happen to fall in rank, and otherways, as shall be thought expedient by the Provost and Baillies for the time; declaring, by these presents, that whatever he be, either Merchant or Craftsman, who makes question, mutiny, or tumult, for their rank, by prerogative or property, and repines at the will and discretion of the...

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