Cavaliers and Roundheads, Or Stories of the Great Civil War

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booksellers, 1881
 

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Page 393 - that according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this Kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by King, Lords, and Commons.
Page 269 - For what do the enemy say ? Nay, what do many say that were friends at the beginning of the parliament ? Even this, — that the members of both Houses have got great places and commands, and the sword into their hands ; and, what by interest in parliament, and what by power in the army, will perpetually continue themselves in grandeur, and not permit the war speedily to end, lest their own power should determine with it.
Page 269 - Therefore, waving a strict inquiry into the causes of these things, let us apply ourselves to the remedy ; which is most necessary. And I hope we have such true English hearts, and zealous affections towards the general weal of our Mother Country, as no Members of either House will scruple to deny themselves, and their own private interests, for the public good...
Page 307 - Mark, child, what I say. They will cut off my head, and perhaps make thee a King. But mark what I say, you must not be a King, so long as your brothers Charles and James do live; for they will cut off your brothers' heads (when they can catch them) and cut off thy head too at the last; and therefore I charge you, do not be made a king by them.
Page 331 - I received your letter with indignation, and with scorn return you this answer; that I cannot but wonder whence you should gather any hopes that I should prove, like you...
Page 54 - On such an occasion the author chanced to call to memory a rhyme recording three names of the manors forfeited by the ancestor of the celebrated Hampden, for striking the Black Prince a blow with his racket, when they quarrelled at tennis: "Tring, Wing, and Ivanhoe, For striking of a blow, Hampden did forego, And glad he could escape so.
Page 22 - Stenny, you are a fool, and will shortly repent this folly, and will find that in this fit of popularity you are making a rod with which you will be scourged yourself...
Page 100 - I thank God I am no more afraid of death, nor daunted with any discouragements arising from my fears, but do as cheerfully put off my doublet at this time as ever I did when I went to bed.
Page 36 - Who rules the kingdom ? The king. Who rules the king ? The duke. Who rules the duke? The devil.
Page 268 - ... casting off all lingering proceedings like [those of] soldiers of fortune beyond sea, to spin out a war -we shall make the kingdom weary of us, and hate the name of a Parliament. For what do the enemy say? Nay, what do many say that were friends at the beginning of the Parliament? Even this, that the members of both Houses have got great places and commands, and the sword, into their hands; and, what by interest in...

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