Shakespeare's Sonnets and A Lover's Complaint: Reprinted in the Orthography, and Punctuation of the Original Edition of 1609

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John Russell Smith, 1609 - Love poetry, English - 76 pages
 

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Page 3 - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate: The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting? And for that riches where is my deserving?
Page 5 - Saturn laugh'd and leap'd with him. Yet nor the lays of birds nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew ; Nor did I wonder at the...
Page 7 - Even such a beauty as you master now. So all their praises are but prophecies Of this our time, all you prefiguring ; And for they look'd but with divining eyes, They had not skill enough* your worth to sing : For we, which now behold these present days, Have eyes to wonder, but lack tongues to praise.
Page 7 - Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul Of the wide world dreaming on things to come, Can yet the lease of my true love control, Supposed as forfeit to a confined doom.
Page 5 - A man in hue all hues in his controlling, Which steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth. And for a woman wert thou first created ; Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting, And by addition me of thee defeated, By adding one thing to my purpose nothing. But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure, Mine be thy love, and thy love's use their treasure.

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