Broadcasting on the Short Waves, 1945 to Today

Front Cover
McFarland, Oct 24, 2008 - Performing Arts - 496 pages
1 Review
Shortwave broadcasting originated in the 1920s, when stations used the new technology to increase their range in order to serve foreign audiences and reach parts of their own country not easily otherwise covered. The early days of shortwave radio were covered in On the Short Waves, 1923–1945: Broadcast Listening in the Pioneer Days of Radio, published by McFarland in 1999 (paperback 2007). Then, two companion volumes were published, picking up the story after World War II. They were Listening on the Short Waves, 1945 to Today (McFarland, 2008; paperback 2010), which focuses on the shortwave listening community, and the present Broadcasting title, about the stations themselves and their environment. The heart of the book is a detailed, year-by-year account of the shortwave bands in each year from 1945 to 2008. It reviews what American listeners were hearing on the international and domestic shortwave bands, describes the arrivals and departures of stations, and recounts important events. The book describes the several categories of broadcasters—international, domestic, private, religious, clandestine and pirate. It explains the impact of relay stations, frequency management, and jamming. It also addresses the considerable changes in shortwave broadcasting since the end of the Cold War. The book is richly illustrated and indexed, and features a bibliography and extensive notes.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I love it, many station I remember. Thx

Contents

Preface
1
Stations by the Year
435
Chapter Notes
455

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Jerome S. Berg, an attorney, was the court administrator for the Massachusetts District Court system until his retirement. A shortwave listener for more than half a century, he is a member of the executive council of the North American Shortwave Association and chair of the Committee to Preserve Radio Verifications.

Bibliographic information