Conferences, Issue 54

Front Cover
Paulist Press, 1985 - Religion - 208 pages
"Translation is based on the text prepared for Sources chr©♭tiennes by Dom E. Pichery"--P. ix. Conference one: The goal or objective of the monk -- Conference two: On discernment -- Conference three: The three renunciations -- Conference nine: On prayer -- Conference ten: On prayer -- Conference eleven: On perfection -- Conference fourteen: On spiritual knowledge -- Conference fifteen: The gifts of God -- Conference eighteen: The three kinds of monk. Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
 

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Contents

THE GOAL OR OBJECTIVE OF THE MONK
37
ON DISCERNMENT
60
THE THREE RENUNCIATIONS
81
ON PRAYER
101
ON PRAYER
125
ON PERFECTION
141
ON SPIRITUAL KNOWLEDGE
155
THE GIFTS OF GOD
174
THE THREE KINDS OF MONK
183
Index to Introduction
202
Index to Texts
204
Copyright

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Page 25 - Let not sorrow dim your eye ; Soon shall every tear be dry : Let not fears your course impede ; Great your strength, if great your need. Onward then to battle move ; More than conquerors ye shall prove : Though opposed by many a foe, Christian soldiers, onward go...
Page 44 - For I was hungry and you gave me to eat; I was thirsty and you gave me to drink; I was a stranger and you took me in. Naked and you covered me; sick and you visited me; I was in prison, and you came to me.

About the author (1985)

John Cassian, an important figure in the early history of monasticism, can be considered one of the principal architects of the western monastic system. He joined a monastery at Bethlehem but left soon after to study monasticism in Egypt. Eventually he found his way west, spending a short time in Rome and settling in Marseilles, where he founded two monasteries. He collected much of his knowledge of monasticism in his Institutes and Conferences. Benedict of Nursia used Cassian's work in his famous monastic Rule. Cassian's theological importance and legacy comes in his disagreement with the Augustinian views of grace and predestination. He maintained that "the first steps towards the Christian life were ordinarily taken by the human will and that Grace supervened only later." His views, traditionally described as semi-Pelagianist, received widespread support in the monasteries in the West.

Bibliographic information