The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 29

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D. Appleton, 1886 - Science
 

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Page 724 - And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth : and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born.
Page 659 - Imperious Caesar, dead and turn'd to clay, Might stop a hole to keep the wind 'away: O, that that earth which kept the world in awe Should patch a wall to expel the winter's flaw!— But soft!
Page 516 - The properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic weights.
Page 55 - I mean by Nature, only the aggregate action and product of many natural laws, and by laws the sequence of events as ascertained by us.
Page 733 - ... mineralogists rather than astronomers must tell us. For a long time it was accepted without hesitation that these bodies required great heat for their first consolidation. Their resemblance to the earth's volcanic rocks was insisted on by mineralogists. Professor J. Lawrence Smith in 1855 asserted without reserve that " they have all been subject to a more or less prolonged igneous action corresponding to that of terrestrial volcanoes.
Page 584 - And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart : and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shall talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.
Page 724 - And there was seen another sign in heaven ; and behold, a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and upon his heads seven diadems.
Page 474 - From the recorded testimony of many competent witnesses, past and present, including observations recently made by scientific men of eminence in various countries, there appears to be, amidst much illusion and deception, an important body of remarkable phenomena, which are prima facie inexplicable on any generally recognized hypothesis, and which, if incontestably established, would be of the highest possible value.
Page 249 - Hampton, the young eels have been seen to ascend the large posts of the flood-gates, in order to make their way, when the gates have been shut longer than usual. Those which die stick to the posts ; others, which get a little higher, meet with the same fate, until at last a sufficient layer of them is formed to enable the rest to overcome the difficulty of the passage.
Page 474 - It has been widely felt that the present is an opportune time for making an organized and systematic attempt to investigate that large group of debatable phenomena designated by such terms as mesmeric, psychical, and spiritistic.

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