History of the Burgh of Canongate: With Notices of the Abbey and Palace of Holyrood

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Page 65 - This simple stone directs pale Scotia's way To pour her sorrows o'er her poet's dust.
Page 130 - Behold how good a thing it is, .. And how becoming well, Together such as brethren are In unity to dwell.
Page 62 - ... in which we have been deprived of so great a number of eminent members. The first whom I shall mention is Principal Lee : — John Lee, late Principal of the University of Edinburgh, was one of the most remarkable and estimable men of his time. His intellectual qualities were of a high order ; his attainments and acquisitions of knowledge were of the most varied and extensive kind. On almost all subjects he was admirably well informed, and in some departments he was unquestionably the most learned...
Page 25 - Thou livedest at thy wish ; thy good old age In wealth and honours took thee off the stage. Thine aged corps interred here now lie, Thy virtues great forbid your name to die. Go ! happy soul, and in thy last repose, Vanquish thou death, and all its fatal blows ; Thy fragrant frame shall thus eternal be, Unto thy country and posterity.
Page 107 - Majesty on the happy re-establishment of his health; and I have the satisfaction of informing you that his Majesty was pleased to receive the same in the most gracious manner.
Page 156 - Hertfordshire, the lectern was found buried in the soil. It is supposed to have been thus concealed at some time during the Civil Wars. It is of cast brass, and of a handsome design, consisting of an eagle with expanded wings supported by a shaft decorated with several groups of mouldings, partly circular and partly hexagonal. The eagle stands upon a globe, and the shaft has been originally supported on three feet, which are now gone. In its present state the lectern is five feet seven inches in...
Page 1 - Church (Holyrood) and my Burgh (Edinburgh) ; and I grant that their Burgesses have common right of selling their wares and of buying in my market freely, and quit of claim and custom, in like manner as my own Burgesses. And I forbid that any one take...
Page 65 - Scottish song, when they shed a tear over the " narrow house '' of the bard who is no more, is surely a tribute due to Fergusson's memory; a tribute I wish to have the honour of paying. "I petition you then, gentlemen, to permit me to lay a simple stone over his revered ashes, to remain an unalienable property to his deathless fame. I have the honour to be, Gentlemen, Your very humble servant, ROBERT BURNS.
Page 140 - He abstained as much as possible from severe measures, and adopted means either to conceal, or recal, such of the rebels as had been rather misled from the paths of loyalty, than actuated by premeditated designs to overturn the government. Indeed, many informations, which he suspected to have been sent by over-officious and malignant persons, were found in his repositories after his death unopened. He was the friend and coadjutor of Archibald, Duke of Argyll, and from the knowledge his Lordship possessed...
Page 142 - at the burning of his house, Lord Dirleton lost a curious Greek manuscript, written with his own hand, for recovery whereof he offered L.1000 sterling to any person that would restore it.

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