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Page 172 - A perfect Judge will read each work of Wit With the same spirit that its author writ: Survey the Whole, nor seek slight faults to find Where nature moves, and rapture warms the mind; Nor lose, for that malignant dull delight, The gen'rous pleasure to be charm'd with wit.
Page 183 - In those very writings which Grotius is gravely blamed for having quoted. The usages and laws of nations, the events of history, the opinions of philosophers, the sentiments of orators and poets, as well as the observation of common life, are, in truth, the materials out of which the science of morality is formed ; and those who neglect them are justly chargeable with a vain attempt to philosophise without regard to fact and experience, — the sole foundation of all true philosophy.
Page 393 - Beyond the pomp of dress ; for loveliness Needs not the foreign aid of ornament, But is, when unadorned, adorned the most ; Thoughtless of beauty, she was Beauty's self, Recluse amid the close-embowering woods.
Page 181 - The reduction of the law of nations to a system was reserved for Grotius. It was by the advice of Lord Bacon and Peiresc that he undertook this arduous task. He produced a work which we now indeed justly deem imperfect, but which is perhaps the most complete that the world has yet owed, at so early a stage in the progress of any science, to the genius and learning of one man.
Page 323 - Z 4 arrivf, arrive, which are predicted in the scriptures, when "the nations shall beat their swords into plow-shares and their spears into pruning hooks ; and they shall learn war no more.
Page 182 - The sagacity of his numerous and fierce adversaries could not discover a blot on his character ; and in the midst of all the hard trials and galling provocations of a turbulent political life, he never once deserted his friends when they were unfortunate, nor insulted his enemies when they were weak.
Page 41 - The face of a laurel-leaf ( Prunus Lauroteraius) is a good match to a stick of red sealing-wax ; and the back of the leaf answers to the lighter red of wafers.
Page 182 - As to those who first used this language, the most candid supposition that we can make with respect to them is, that they never read the work ; for, if they had not been deterred from the perusal of it by such a formidable display of Greek characters, they must soon have discovered that Grotius never quotes on any subject till he has first appealed to some principles, and often, in my humble opinion, though not always, to the soundest and most rational principles. But another sort of answer is due...
Page 182 - ... of my readers only by name. Yet, if we fairly estimate both his endowments and his virtues, we may justly consider him as one of the most memorable men who have done honour to modern times. He combined the discharge of the most important duties of active and public life with the attainment of that exact and various learning which is generally the portion only of the recluse student. He was distinguished as an advocate and a magistrate, and he composed the most valuable works on the law of his...
Page 184 - Grotius seems to have been the first who attempted to give the world any thing like a system of those principles which ought to run through, and be the foundation of, the laws of all nations...

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