Page images
PDF
EPUB

CO N T E N T S.

BOOK I.

Of ANNATE Notions.

5. Not on the mind natus

raily imprinted, because
not known to children,

idiots, &c.
6,7. That men know them

when they come to the

use of reason, answered.

- 8. If reason discovered them,

that would not prove them

innate.

9-11. It is false, that reason disa

covers them.

12. The coming to the use

of reason, not the time

we come to know these

maxims

13. By this, they are not dis.

tinguished from other

knowable truths.

14. If coming to the use of

reason were the time of

their discovery, it would

not prove them innate,

15, 16. The steps by which the

mind attains several truths,
17. Assenting as soon as pro-

posed and understood,

proves them not innate.
18. If such an assent be a

mark of innate, then that
one and two are equal
to three; that sweetness
is not bitterness; and a
thousand the like, must be

innate.
19. Sach less general propofi.

CHA P. II.

No innate principles in the mind,

and particularly no innate spe.

culative principles.
SECT.
1. The way shown how we come

by any knowledge, sufficient

to prove it not innate.
2. General assent, the great ar.

gument.
3. Universal consent proves no.

thing innate.
-4. What is, is; and, it is im-

possible for the same thing
to be, and not to be; not
universally assented to.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

tions known before these

not their internal prin.
universal maxims.

'ciple.
20. One and one equal to 8. Conscience no proof of
two, &c. not general, nor

any innate moral rule.
useful, answered. . . 9. Instances of enormities
21. These maxims not being

practised without re.
known sometimes till pro-

morse..
posed, proves them not in. 10. Men have contrary prac.
nate.

tical principles. *
22. Implicitly known before 11 -13. Whole nations reject sea
proposing, signifies, that

veral moral rules.
the mind is capable of 4. Those who maintain in.
understanding them, or

nate practical principles,
else signiftes nothing.

tell us not what they are.
The argument of assenting 15-19. Lord Herbert's innate
on first hearing, is upon a

principles examined.
false supposition of no pre. 20. Obj. "Innate principles
cedent teaching.

may be corrupted, an.
24. Not innate, because not

swered.
universally assented to.

21. Contrary principles in
25. These maxims not the first

the world.
known.

-26. How men commonly
26. And so not innate.

come by their principles.
27. Not innate, because they 27. Principles must be exa.
appear least, where what

mined.
is innate, shows itself

clearest.
28. Recapitulation.

CHAP. IV.

Other considerations about innate
CHA P. III.

principles, both speculative and
No innate practical principles. practical.
SECT.

SECT.
1. No moral principles s0 1 . Principles not innate, un.
clear and so generally re.

less their ideas be innate.
ceived as the fore-menti. 2, 3. Ideas, especially those be.
oned speculative maxims.

longing to principles, not
2. Faith and justice not own.

born with children. .
ed as principles by all 4, 5. Identity, an idea not in.
men.

nate.
3. Obj. Though men deny 6. Whole and part, not in.
them in their practice, yet

nate ideas.
they admit them in their 7. Idea of worship not in.
thoughts, answered.

nate.
4. Moral rules need a proof, 8 11. Idea of God, not innate.
ergo, not innate.

12. Suitable to God's good-
Instance in keeping com.

ness, that all men should
pacts.

have an idea of him,
6. Virtue generally approved, therefore naturaily im-
not because innate, but be.

printed by him; an.
cause profitable.

swered.
7. Men’s actions convince us, 13-16. Ideas of God, various in
that the rule of virtue is

different men.
a 2

12. Su

77. H

[merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

CHAP. I.

Of ideas in general.

SECT.

1. Idea is the object of

thinking.

2. All ideas come from sen.

sation or reflection.

3. The objects of sensation

one source of ideas.

4. The operations of our

minds, the other source

of them.

5. All our idcas are of the

one or the other of these,

6. Observable in children.

7. Men are diffarently fur.

nished with these, accord.
ing to the different object3

they converse with.

8. Ideas of reflection later,

because they need atten.

tion,

9. The soul begins to have

ideas, when it begins to

perceive.
10. The soul thinks not al.

ways; for this wanas

proofs.

11. It is not always conscious

of it.

112. IF a Deeping man thinks-

24. The original of all our CHA P. VII.

knowledge.

25. In the reception of simple of simple-ideas, both of sensation

ideas the understanding is

and reflection.

most of all passive. SECT.

1__6. Pleasure and pain.

CHA P. II.

7. Existence and unity.

Of simple ideas.

8. Power.

SECT.

9. Succession.

1. Uncompounded

10. Simple ideas, the mate.

appear.

rials of all our know.

ances.

ledge.

2, 3. The mind can neither

make nor destroy them.

CHA P. VIII.

CH A P. III. Other considerations concerning

Of ideas of one sense.

simple ideas.

SECT.
1. As colours, of seeing;

1-6. Positive ideas from priva.

sounds, of hearing.

tive causes.

2. Few simple ideas have

7, 8. Ideas in the mind, quali.

names.

ties in bodies.

9, 10. Primary and secondary

CHA P. IV.

qualities.

Of solidity.

11, 12, How primary qualities

SECT.

produce their ideas.

1. We receive this idea from 13, 14. How secondary.

15–23. Ideas of primary quali.

touch.

ties, are resemblances; of

2. Solidity fills space.

secondary, not.

3. Distinct from space. 24, 25. Reason of our mistake in

4. From hardness.

this.

s. On solidity depend im.

26. Secondary qualities two.
pulse, resistance, and pro-

fold; first, immediately
trusion,

perceivable; secondly,

6. What it is.

mediately perceivable.

CHA P. V.

CH A P. IX.

Of simple ideas by more than one

sense.

Of perception.

SECT.
C'HA P. VI.

1. It is the first simple idea

of reflection.
Of simple ideas of reflection,

2-4. Perception is only when
SECT.

the mind receives the im.
1. Simple ideas are the opera.

pression.
tions of the mind about 6. Children, tho they have

its other ideas.

ideas in the womb, have

2. The idea of perception,

none innate.

and idea of wiling, we 7. Which ideas first, is not

have from reflection.

evident.

8-10. Ideas

8-10. Ideas of sensation often CH A P. XI.
changed by the judgment.

Of complex ideas.
11-14. Perception puts the diffe.

SECT.

rence between acimals

1. Made by the mind out

and inferior beings.
Perception the inlat of

of simple ones.

2. Made voluntarily. " .

knowledge.

3. Are either modes, sub,

stances, or relations,

CH A P. X.

4. Modes.

Of retention.

5. Simple and mixed modes..

SEĆ T.

6. Substances single or cof,

lective.

1. Contemplation.

7. Relation.

--2. Memory.

8. The abstrusest ideas from

3. Attention, repetition,

the two sources.

pleasure and pain, fix

ideas.

4, 3. Ideas fade in the memory. CHA P. XIII.

6. Constantly repeated ideas Of space and its simple modes,

• can scarce be lost.

SECT. '

7. In remembering, the 1. Simple modes.

mind is often active.

2. Idea of space.

8, 9. Two defects in the me.

3. Space and extension,

morý, oblivion and slow,

4. Immensity.

ness.

6. Figure. .

io. Brutes have memory.

7-10. Place,

T--14. Extension and body not

| C H A P. XI.

the same.

of discerning, &c.

156 The definition of exten,

sion, or of space, does

SECT.

not explain it.

1. No knowledge without 16. Division of beings into

it.

bodies and spirits proves

2. The difference of wit

not body and space the

and judgment.

same. .'

3. Clearness alone hinders 17, 18. Substance, which we
confusion.

know not, no proof against
4. Comparirg.

space without body. .

5. Brures comparé but im. 19, 20. Substance and accidents

perfectly. '

of little use in philo.

6. Compounding.

sophy.

7. Brutes compound but 21. A vacuum beyond the ut,

little,

mose bounds of body.

8. Naning.

The power of annihilation

9. Abstraction.

proves a vacuum.

1o, II. Erutes abstract not.

23: Motion proves a vacuum.
13. Idiots and mad men.

24. The ideas of space and

14. Method.

body distinct.

15. These are the beginnings 25, 26. Extension being insepara.
of human knowledge.

ble from body, proves it
16. Appeal to experience,

not the same,

17. Dark room.

27. Idcas

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »