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Books Books 1 - 10 of 17 on varies directly as the mass of the attracting body and inversely as the square of....
" varies directly as the mass of the attracting body and inversely as the square of its distance from the attracted body. "
Plane astronomy - Page 3
by Alexander Ronald Grant - 1850
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The Mathematical Principles of Mechanical Philosophy: And Their Application ...

John Henry Pratt - Gravitation - 1836 - 616 pages
...consideration of the motion of a given number of material particles attracting each other with forces varying directly as the mass of the attracting body and inversely as the square of the distance. This Problem is one of insuperable difficulty when considered in a general point of view,...
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The Mathematical Principles of Mechanical Philosophy: And Their ..., Part 1

John Henry Pratt - Mathematics - 1845 - 620 pages
...consideration of the motion of a given number of material particles attracting each other with forces varying directly as the mass of the attracting body and inversely as the square of the distance. This Problem is one of insuperable difficulty when considered in a general point of view,...
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An astronomical vocabulary, an explanation of all terms in use amongst ...

John Russell Hind - 1852
...matter in the universe has a tendency to attract every other particle with a force proportioned to the mass of the attracting body, and inversely as the square of the distance between them. Gravity, Terrestrial, is that law of nature, in virtue of which all bodies...
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THE MECHANICS MAGAZINE, JULY 1 - DECEMBER 30, 1854

R.A. BROOMAN - 1854
...Attraction" il a phrase distinct and plain enough ; for there is such a "law," viz., that the attraction varies directly as the mass of the attracting body, and inversely as the square of the distance between the attracting and attracted masses, but there is no such " law," and no law,...
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The Mechanics' Magazine, Volume 61

Industrial arts - 1854
...Attraction" в а phrase distinct and plain enough ; for there is such a "law," viz., that the attraction varies directly as the mass of the attracting body, and inversely as the square of the distance between the attracting and attracted masses. But there is no such " law," and no law,...
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Iron: An Illustrated Weekly Journal for Iron and Steel ..., Volume 63

Sholto Percy - Industrial arts - 1855
...other body with a force proportional directly to its там ; that ia, the quantity of matter in it, and inversely as the square of its distance from the attracted body. It is not too much to say, that if any of these three laws were untrue, the appearance of the planet...
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The Mechanics' Magazine, Volume 63

Industrial arts - 1855
...other body with a force proportional directly to its mass ; that is, the quantity of matter in it, and inversely as the square of its distance from the attracted body. It is not too much to lay, that if any of these three laws were untrue, the appearance of the planet...
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THE MECHANICS' MAGAZINE

R.A. BROOMAN - 1855
...other body with a force proportional directly to its mass ; that is, the quantity of matter in it, and inversely as the square of its distance from the attracted body. It is not too much to say, that if any of these three laws were untrue, the appearance of the planet...
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Orr's Circle of the Sciences: Mechanical philosophy

William Somerville Orr - Science - 1856
...the, best measure of force, when the motion of bodies is to be estimated. When we say that a force varies directly as the mass of the attracting body,...and inversely as the square of its distance from the body attracted, we mean that the force of attraction will be measured by the mass divided by the square...
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The First Principles of Natural Philosophy

William Thynne Lynn - Physics - 1863 - 100 pages
...every particle of matter in the universe is attracted towards every other particle with a force varying directly as the mass of the attracting body, and inversely as the square of the distance between the attracting and attracted bodies. So that if A and B are two bodies, of which...
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