Famous regiments of the British army: their origin and services. With a sketch of the rise and progress of the military establishment of England, and brief memoirs of eminent British generals

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Page 133 - The most triumphant death is that of the martyr ; the most awful that of the martyred patriot ; the most splendid that of the hero in the hour of victory : and if the chariot and the horses of fire had been vouchsafed for Nelson's translation, he could scarcely have departed in a brighter blaze of glory.
Page 20 - The country rings around with loud alarms, And raw in fields the rude militia swarms; Mouths without hands; maintained at vast expense, In peace a charge, in war a weak defence ; Stout once a month they march, a blustering band, And ever, but in times of need, at hand...
Page 186 - I called it forth, and drew it into your service, a hardy and intrepid race of men ! men, who, when left by your jealousy, became a prey to the artifices of your enemies, and had gone nigh to have overturned the state in the war before the last.
Page 17 - Their baldrics set with studs, athwart their shoulders cast, To which under their arms their sheafs were buckled fast, A short sword at their belt, a buckler scarce a span, Who struck below the knee, not counted then a man : All made of Spanish yew, their bows were wondrous strong ; They not an arrow drew but was a cloth-yard long. Of archery they had the very perfect craft, With broad arrow, or but, or prick, or roving shaft...
Page 73 - For dearly must we prize thee ; we who find In thee a bulwark for the cause of men ; And I by my affection was beguiled : What wonder if a Poet now and then, Among the many movements of his mind, Felt for thee as a lover or a child ! OCTOBER, 1803.
Page 180 - ... conquest or death, When the banners are blazing on mountain and heath: They call to the dirk, the claymore, and the targe, To the march and the muster, the line and the charge. Be the brand of each chieftain like Fin's in his ire! May the blood through his veins flow like currents of fire!
Page 221 - Strevan about six in the morning yesterday, and resolving to convey them to this, I thought that we might make a little tour to see if we could fall upon a conventicle...
Page 56 - It is in and through Symbols that man, consciously or unconsciously, lives, works, and has his being : those ages, moreover, are accounted the noblest which can the best recognise symbolical worth, and prize it the highest.
Page 222 - Whate'er he did was done with so much ease, In him alone 'twas natural to please : His motions all accompanied with grace ; And paradise was open'd in his face.

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