The Law of Population: A Treatise, in Six Books; in Disproof of the Superfecundity of Human Beings, and Developing of the Real Principle of Their Increase, Volume 2

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J. Murray, 1830 - Malthusianism - 690 pages

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Page 647 - No flocks that range the valley free, To slaughter I condemn: Taught by that Power that pities me, I learn to pity them...
Page 675 - And there went forth a wind from the LORD, and brought quails from the sea, and let them fall by the camp, as it were a day's journey on this side, and as it were a day's journey on the other side, round about the camp, and as it were two cubits high upon the face of the earth.
Page 41 - But, to be perfectly sure that we are far within the truth, we will take the slowest of these rates of increase, a rate in which all concurring testimonies agree, and which has been repeatedly ascertained to be from procreation only. It may safely be pronounced, therefore, that population, when unchecked, goes on doubling itself every twenty-five years, or increases in a geometrical ratio.
Page 28 - Hence marriages in America are more general, and more generally early, than in Europe. And if it is reckoned there, that there is but one marriage per annum among 100 persons, perhaps we may here reckon two ; and if in Europe, they have but four births to a marriage, (many of their marriages being late) we may here reckon eight, of which, if one half grow up, and our marriages are made, reckoning one with another, at twenty years of age, our people must at least be doubled every twenty years.
Page 617 - Through the animal and vegetable kingdoms Nature has scattered the seeds of life abroad with the most profuse and liberal hand; but has been comparatively sparing in the room and the nourishment necessary to rear them.
Page 159 - Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty; Calls virtue, hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers...
Page 28 - And if it is reckoned there, that there is but one marriage per annum among one hundred persons, perhaps we may here reckon two ; and if in Europe they have but four births to a marriage (many of their marriages being late), we may here reckon eight, of which, if one half grow up, and our marriages are made, reckoning one with another, at twenty years of age, our people must at least be doubled every twenty years.
Page 224 - ... and by a decrease in the number of burials ; consequently by an increase in the excess of the births above the deaths. Also, that any material rise in the price is generally attended by a corresponding decrease in the marriages and...
Page 681 - O give thanks unto the God of heaven : for his mercy endureth for ever.
Page 640 - The stork in the heavens knoweth her appointed time ; and the turtle, and the crane, and the swallow, observe the time of their coming*.

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