Creation and the Persistence of Evil: The Jewish Drama of Divine Omnipotence

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Princeton University Press, Dec 19, 1994 - Religion - 182 pages
2 Reviews

This paperback edition brings to a wide audience one of the most innovative and meaningful models of God for this post-Auschwitz era. In a thought-provoking return to the original Hebrew conception of God, which questions accepted conceptions of divine omnipotence, Jon Levenson defines God's authorship of the world as a consequence of his victory in his struggle with evil. He traces a flexible conception of God to the earliest Hebrew sources, arguing, for example, that Genesis 1 does not describe the banishment of evil but the attempt to contain the menace of evil in the world, a struggle that continues today.

 

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User Review  - pomonomo2003 - LibraryThing

This is an interesting book. Our author, Jon D. Levenson, is both a monotheist and a believer in God's Omnipotence.This is curious because omnipotence is not here conceived as mere fact but, as our ... Read full review

Contents

The Basic Idea of Israelite Religion?
3
The Survival of Chaos After the Victory of God
14
The Futurity and Presence of the Cosmogonic Victory
26
Conclusion The Vitality of Evil and the Fragility of Creation
47
Creation Without Opposition Psalm 104
53
Creation in Seven Days
66
Cosmos and Microcosm
78
Rest and ReCreation
100
Conclusion Chaos Neutralized in Cult
121
The Two Idioms of Biblical Monotheism
131
The Dialectic of Covenantal Theonomy
140
Argument and Obedience
149
Notes
157
Scripture Index
177
Author Index
181
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About the author (1994)

Jon D. Levenson is Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at Harvard Divinity School.

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