Shakespeare: Hamlet

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Cambridge University Press, May 13, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 101 pages
In this useful guide, Paul Cantor provides a clearly structured introduction to Shakespeare's most famous tragedy. Cantor examines Hamlet's status as tragic hero and the central enigma of the delayed revenge in the light of the play's Renaissance context. He offers students a lucid discussion of the dramatic and poetic techniques used in the play. In the final chapter he deals with the uniquely varied reception of Hamlet on the stage and in literature generally from the seventeenth century to the present day.

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Contents

Hamlet and the Renaissance
1
2 Heroism in the Renaissance epic tradition
5
3 Tragedy and Renaissance man
11
4 The place of Hamlet in Shakespeares career
15
The tragedy of Hamlet
20
6 Hamlet and the revenge play tradition
25
7 Hamlet and classical heroism
30
8 Hamlet and Christianity
37
Dramatic and poetic technique
60
12 The language of Hamlet
70
The heritage of Hamlet
77
14 Hamlet in the nineteenth century
79
15 The comic Hamlet
82
16 Hamlet in the twentieth century
85
Works cited
93
Guide to further reading
95

9 Hamlet as tragic hero
49
10 The end of Hamlet
53

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About the author (2004)

Paul A. Cantor has authored dozens of articles in various publications and is a regular contributor to The Weekly Standard and The American Enterprise, Cantor lives in Charlottesville, Virginia, where he is professor of English at the University of Virginia.

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