The Constitutional History of England Since the Accession of George the Third, 1760-1860, Volume 2

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Page 216 - They parted - ne'er to meet again! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs, which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between; But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Page 385 - If all mankind, minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.
Page 73 - Your representative owes you not his industry only, but his judgment ; and he betrays instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.
Page 73 - Parliament is not a congress of Ambassadors from different and hostile interests, which interests each must maintain as an agent and advocate against other agents and advocates, but Parliament is a deliberative Assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole...
Page 129 - LORD, from the evil man ; and preserve me from the wicked man ; 2 Who imagine mischief in their hearts, and stir up strife all the day long. 3 They have sharpened their tongues like a serpent; adder's poison is under their lips.
Page 324 - ... in direct opposition to the declared sense of a great majority of the nation, and they should be put in force with all their rigorous provisions, if his opinion were asked by the people as to their obedience, he should tell them, that it was no longer a question of moral obligation and duty, but of prudence.
Page 72 - But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you, to any man, or to any set of men living.
Page 241 - Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.
Page 126 - I composed the peroration of my speech for the Queen, in the Lords, after reading and repeating Demosthenes for three or four weeks, and I composed it twenty times over at least, and it certainly succeeded in a very extraordinary degree, and far above any merits of its own.
Page 80 - In his direction to the jury, his lordship said " that the fact of the House of Commons having directed Messrs. Hansard to publish all their parliamentary reports is no justification for them, or for any bookseller who publishes a parliamentary report containing a libel against any man.

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