The Select Works of Jonathan Swift: Containing the Whole of His Poetical Works, the Tale of a Tab, Battle of the Books, Gulliver's Travels, Directions to Servants, Art of Punning, Etc, Volume 1

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Hector McLean, 1823
 

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Page 210 - ... by a lazy contemplation of four inches round, by an overweening pride, feeding and engendering on itself, turns all into excrement and venom, producing nothing at all, but flybane and a cobweb ; or that which, by a universal range, with long search, much study, true judgment, and distinction of things, brings home honey and wax.
Page 69 - What is that which some call land, but a fine coat faced with green ? or the sea, but a waistcoat of...
Page 137 - ... first, it is generally affirmed or confessed that learning puffeth men up : and, secondly, they proved it by the following syllogism : " Words are but wind, and learning is nothing but words ; ergo, learning is nothing but wind.
Page 59 - Wisdom is a hen, whose cackling we must value and consider, because it is attended with an egg ; but then lastly, it is a nut, which, unless you choose with judgment, may cost you a tooth, and pay you with nothing but a worm.
Page 196 - Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind of reception it meets in the world, and that so very few are offended with it.
Page 207 - ... which, yielding to the unequal weight, sunk down to the very foundation. Thrice he endeavoured to force his passage, and thrice the centre shook. The spider within, feeling the terrible convulsion, supposed, at first, that nature was approaching to her final dissolution ; or else, that Beelzebuh, with all his legions, was come to revenge the death of many thousands of his subjects, whom this enemy had slain and devoured.
Page 302 - Th' unwilling gratitude of base mankind. POPE. ' CENSURE,' says a late ingenious author, ' is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent.
Page 32 - I do therefore affirm upon the word of a sincere man, that there is now actually in being a certain poet called John Dryden, whose translation .of Virgil was lately printed in a large folio, well bound, and if diligent search were made, for aught I know, is yet to be seen.
Page 155 - Epicurus, content his ideas with the films and images that fly off upon his senses from the superficies of things...
Page 298 - The latter part of a wise man's life is taken up in curing the follies, prejudices, and false opinions he had contracted in the former. Would a writer know how to behave himself with relation to posterity, let him consider in old books what he finds that he is glad to know,- and what omissions he most laments.

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