A View of Devonshire in MDCXXX: With a Pedigree of Most of Its Gentry

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W. Roberts, 1845 - Devon (England) - 649 pages
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Comprising 2 works, "A view of Devonshire" and "The pedigrees of most of our Devonshire families", from an unpublished manuscript.
 

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Contents

Of the Merchant which is the third degree
51
Of the last degree which is DayLabourers in Tinworks and Hirelings in Husbandry
52
Of the Commodities this Country yields and of Agriculture and Husbandry
54
Of the second Commodity of Clothing and Drapery
59
Of Mines and Quarries of Stone and of the several sorts of either of them
63
Of Mariners Shipping and Fishing
67
and first of the Ec clesiastical
69
Of the Martial Government with the chief and other Commanders
71
being the third
73
Of the Admiralty and Government for Maritime and Sea Causes XX The Stannary Laws and Government which concern Tinners and Tin Causes
75
The description of the Forest of Dartmoor where Tin is mined
79
Of certain Tenants of the Forest called Fenfieldmen
84
Of the Forest of Exmoor BOOK II
88
An entrance into the East Division together with the original and progress
93
of the River
94
Of the Hundred of Bampton containing six Parishes III Of the Hundred of Tiverton containing five Parishes
98
chap PAGE IV The Hundred of Halberton containeth three parishes
105
The progress of the River Culme
112
The original and progress of Creedy River
118
Of Crediton and the Bishops thereof
120
Of the farther progress of the River Creedy and the places adjacent
127
of the progress of the River Creedy to CowleyBridge where it joins with Exe
131
Of the Antiquity and divers Names of the City of Exeter
135
Of the Situation and Places worthy observation in this City
138
PAGE
141
Of the Dukes Marquises and Earls of Exeter
142
Of the Monasteries and AlmsHouses belonging to the City of Exeter
145
Of Bedford House and the noble Family of the Russells
147
Of the Guildhall Magistrates and the several Corporations thereof
149
35
150
Of the CathedralChurch of St Peters The antiquity and building thereof
153
Of the Bishops and other Dignitaries of the Church of Exeter
157
42
167
The Bishops of Exeter after the Reformation
172
The Bishops of Exeter since the present Authors time unto this day Oc tober 20th 1695 by John Prince
176
Of the Inferior Dignitaries of the Church of Exeter
180
The Monuments and Epitaphs in Saint Peters Cathedral Exon
182
An Epilogue or Conclusion on the View of Exeter
184
Of the progress of the River Exe below Exeter
185
BOOK III
186
Of the Circuit of the River Clyst
191
Of Powderham Castle and the Noble Family of Courtenay
200
A Catalogue of the Earls and Dukes of Devon before the Conquest
203
Of the Earls of Devon after the Conquest and First of Redvers
204
Of the right noble Family of the Courtenays Earls of Devon
208
51
212
Of those other noble Families which have since been Earls of Devon
217
Of Kenn and some other places on the west side of the River Exe
218
Of places on the east side of the River Exe
223
The Passage of the River Otter
224
chap AGE III Of BerryNerbert Bowdon and Bishop Jewel
256
Of Morthoe Tracy and MortStone
259
54
260
Of GeorgeHam and Pidickwell
263
WI Of the River Taw his spring and progress
265
WII Of Affton and the Family of Stukely
270
Of Chulmleigh and the Countess of Devon saving seven little Children that were carrying to be drowned
273
Of RingsAsh with the original and course of the River Mole
276
Of Molland Botreaux the Nymets and other places near by
280
Of the meeting of Mole and Taw their passage afterwards to Umberlegh
283
Of Brightlegh and the Family of Giffard
286
Of TawtonBishop Goodley Newland c
289
Of Tawstock and the noble Family of the Bourchiers Earls of Bath
292
Of the Borough of Barnstaple with the Description of the Town with the History of the Lord Audlegh 29 4
294
Of the progress of the River Yeo of Chalacombe with the strange Burrows therein with some other neighbouring Parishes
300
Of Youlston and Ralegh and the noble Family of the Chichesters
303
Of Marwood and the Family of Westcote with other Places and Families in that tract
305
Of WestDown and the Hundred of Braunton
308
The origin and course of the River Torridge with HerculesPromontory
311
Of the progress of the River Torridge and the most eminent places near its first original as Putford and the Hundred of Shebbear
315
Of the Hundred of BlackTorrington and places adjoining
317
Of the progress of the River Okement and of Okehampton
321
Of Iddesleigh Winkleigh and other places in the way to Torrington
324
Of Torrington and therein of the potent Families of Rolle Barry c
327
Of Monkley and the Family of Hankford
331
Of BucklandBrewer Parkham Bideford the noble Family of Grenville
335
Of Westleigh Northam Kenith Castle and Abbotsham
341
Of the Island of Lundy lying near this county in the Severn Sea
343
The Conclusion of this Northern Journey
345
BOOK V
346
Of Tamerton Collacombe and the Family of Tremayn
352
The origin of the River Lyd of Lydford his antiquities and present state
355
Of TrenchardLew Marystow Lifton other places in our way to Tavistock
361
Of the progress of the River Tavy of the Borough Abbey of Tavistock
365
Of the progress of the Tamar to the town of Plymouth by Buckland Beer Tamerton c
372
88
418
P E D I G R E
457
Babington of Knoll 473 Bowerman of Hemyock 518
465
Gale of Dartmouth and Crediton 567
466
Pollard of Way and Horwood 552
470
Battishill of Westwyke 540 Bullon Earl of Ormond Wiltshire
476
Beaumont of Gittesham 498 Burgoin of Bideford 551
494
Bury alias Berry of BerryNerber
495
Butler Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire 483
507
Carew of East Anthony
528
Giffard of Brightlegh 627
530
Henscot of Henscot 589
536
Carwithen of Carwithen c
541
Chudleigh of Ashton 462
555

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Page 360 - I OFT have heard of Lydford law, How in the morn they hang and draw, And sit in judgment after : At first I wondered at it much ; But since I find the reason such, As it deserves no laughter.
Page 5 - Soul into the hands of God who gave it and my body to the Earth to be buried in a decent...
Page 360 - They say the parson hath a gown, But I saw ne'er a cloak. Whereby you may consider well, That plain simplicity doth dwell, At Lydford, without bravery ; And in the town, both young and grave, Do love the naked truth to have, No cloak to hide their knavery.
Page 301 - I cannot comprehend, in very short time after lost senses both of sight and hearing, and in less than three months consuming died. He was in all his lifetime accounted an honest man ; and he constantly reported this, divers times, to men of good quality, with protestations to the truth thereof even to his death.
Page 360 - Twere better to be stoned and pressed, Or hanged, now choose you whether. " Ten men less room within this cave Than five mice in a lantern have. The keepers they are sly ones. If any could devise by art To get it up into a cart, 'Twere fit to carry lions.
Page 300 - A daily labouring man by the work of his hand and sweat of his brow having gotten a little money, was desirous to have a place to rest himself in old age, and therefore bestowed it on some acres of waste land, and began to build a house thereon near, or not far from, one of these...
Page 378 - cost" were coupled together; as the labour is attributed above to Drake so should the cost be], but in this his undaunted spirit and bounty( !) (like another Hannibal making way through the unpassable Alps) had soon the victory, and finished it to the great and continual commodity of the town and his own commendation.
Page 360 - Gubbins' cave — A people that no knowledge have Of law, of God, or men ; Whom Caesar never yet subdued ; Who've lawless liv'd ; of manners rude ; All savage in their den. By whom, if any pass that way, He dares not the least time to stay, For presently they howl ; Upon which signal they do muster Their naked forces in a cluster, Led forth by Roger Rowle.
Page 301 - ... not long a-doing; but as he thrust in his arm, and fastened his hand thereon, suddenly he heard, or seemed to hear, the noise of the treading or trampling of horses, coming, as he thought, towards him; which caused him to forbear and arise from the place, fearing the comers would take his purchase from him (for he assured himself it was treasure) ; but looking about every way to see what company this was. he saw neither horse nor man in view. To the pot again he goes, and had the like success...
Page 79 - ... sine occasione vel impedimento nostri vel heredum nostrorum, justiciariorum, escaetorum, vicecomitum, aut aliorum ballivorum seu ministrorum nostrorum quorumcunque rationabiliter gaudeant et utantur in forma predicta.

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