Men and the Making of Modern British Feminism

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Stanford University Press, Dec 18, 2009 - History - 272 pages

Men and the Making of Modern British Feminism calls fresh attention to the forgotten but foundational contributions of men to the creation of modern British feminism. Focusing on the revolutionary 1790s, the book introduces several dozen male reformers who insisted that women's emancipation would be key to the establishment of a truly just and rational society. These men proposed educational reforms, assisted women writers into print, and used their training in religion, medicine, history, and the law to challenge common assumptions about women's legal and political entitlements.

This book uses men's engagement with women's rights as a platform to reconsider understandings of gender in eighteenth-century Britain, the meaning and legacy of feminism, and feminism's relationship more generally to traditions of radical reform and enlightenment.

 

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Contents

Becoming Champions of the Fair Sex
11
Cultivating Woman
37
Publishing Woman
60
Revising the Sexual Contract
82
Imagining the Female Citizen
106
The Champions Legacy
131
Biographical Appendix
137
Notes
149
Bibliography
211
Index
245
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About the author (2009)

Arianne Chernock is Assistant Professor of History at Boston University.

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