The Crescent and the Cross: Or, Romance and Realities of Eastern Travel, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1848 - Egypt
 

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Page 236 - Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm from an anointed king ; The breath of worldly men cannot depose The deputy elected by the Lord.
Page 210 - Branches they bore of that enchanted stem, Laden with flower and fruit, whereof they gave To each, but whoso did receive of them And taste, to him the gushing of the wave Far far away did seem to mourn and rave On alien shores...
Page 3 - We must pronounce Miss Strickland beyond all comparison the most entertaining historian in the English language. She is certainly a woman of powerful and active mind, as well as of scrupulous justice and honesty of purpose.
Page 265 - They that see thee shall narrowly look upon thee, and consider thee, saying, Is this the man that made the earth to tremble, that did shake kingdoms; that made the world as a wilderness, and destroyed the cities thereof; that opened not the house of his prisoners?
Page 9 - D'Arblay lired to be a classic. Time set on her fame, before she went hence, that seal which is seldom set except on the fame of the departed. All those whom we have been accustomed to revere as intellectual patriarchs seemed children when compared with her; for Burke had sat up all night to read her writings, and Johnson had pronounced her superior to Fielding, when Rogers was still a schoolboy, and Southey still in petticoats. Her Diary is written in her earliest and best manner; in true woman's...
Page 33 - The spirits of your fathers Shall start from every wave ! — For the deck it was their field of fame, And Ocean was their grave...
Page 17 - This work has already reached a third edition. We shall be surprised if it do not go through many. It possesses almost every qualification of a good book — grace, variety, and vigour of style — a concentrated power of description, which has all the effect of elaborate painting — information carefully collected and judiciously communicated — sound and enlarged views of important questions — a hearty and generous love of country — and the whole pervaded by a refined but sometimes caustic...
Page 9 - English, clear, natural, and lively. It ought to be consulted by every person who wishes to be well acquainted with the history of our literature and our manners. The account which she gives of the king's illness will, we think, be more valued by the historians of a future age than any equal portions of Pepys' or Evelyn's Diaries." — Edinburgh Review. " This publication will take its place in the libraries beside Walpole and Boswell.
Page 12 - The most complete, the most convenient, and the cheapest work of the kind ever given to the public." — Sun. " The best genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage, and the first authority on all questions affecting the aristocracy.
Page 2 - A work of greater interest than has been placed before the public for a considerable time. The Memoirs abound in matter which is both useful and amusing. The political portions of the work are of undoubted value and interest, and embody a considerable amount of very curious historical information, hitherto inaccessible even to the most determined and persevering student.

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