Lectures ... to working men, Volume 2

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Page 68 - And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years ; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry. But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee : then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided 1 So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.
Page 57 - And the king said unto his servants, Know ye not that there is a prince and a great man fallen this day in Israel?
Page 50 - THAT AND A' THAT" Is there, for honest Poverty, That hangs his head, and a' that! The coward slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a
Page 65 - If their names were not found in the registers of heralds, they felt assured that they were recorded in the Book of Life. If their steps were not accompanied by a splendid train of menials, legions of ministering angels had charge over them.
Page 9 - And he answering said unto him, Lord, let it alone this year also, till I shall dig about it, and dung it...
Page 61 - But ye are come unto Mount Zion, and unto the city of the Living God, the Heavenly Jerusalem; and to an innumerable company of Angels, to the general assembly and Church of the first-born which are written in Heaven; and to God the Judge of all; and to the spirits of just men made perfect...
Page 61 - Ye are come to Mount Zion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, to the general assembly and church of the first-born whose names are written in heaven...
Page 65 - The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the -will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute.
Page 66 - He had been wrested by no common deliverer from the grasp of no common foe. He had been ransomed by the sweat of no vulgar agony, by the blood of no * earthly sacrifice.
Page 129 - See, from his head, his hands, his feet, Sorrow and love flow mingled down; Did e'er such love and sorrow meet, Or thorns compose so rich a crown ? 4. Were the whole realm of nature mine, That were a present far too small ; Love so amazing, so divine, Demands my soul, my life, my all.

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