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Confidence in Christ

109
Conduct of Christian Professors at
Watering Places

264

Cruelty Disarmed by Meekness 228

Curiosity Improved

68

Depravity awfully Displayed

347

Descent of the Holy Spirit

180

Despondency Removed

500

Devotional Frame

68

Discourse on the Institution of the

Lord's Supper

92, 128

Discourse on the Sacrificial Character

of Christ

7, 48

Divine Prescience Compatible with

the Freedom of Human Actions 340
Doing good to others the test of gra-
cious character

460
Dreadful Prayer-meeting

220
End of a Pious Irishman

145
Evil Speaking

175
Flour and those other Little Things 188
Glory of Christ the motive to Chris-
tian Effort-

386
Good Counsel

18

Hints of Encouragement to Sabbath-

School Teachers

218

How came it to Pass—

421
How to Act in Cases of Doubt

369

“ I don't think Religion requires it" 107

“I must Praise more"

257

“ I must Pray more

19

I must Pray differently”

134

“ If two of you shall agree it shall be

17

Immateriality of the Soul

55

Influence of Character

23
Irish Round Towers

98
Judgment and Mercy

109
Leechman, Rev. Dr.

205
Letter to a Methodist Class Leader 25, 303
Maynooth Grant

250

Means of promoting Christian Union 143

Means of attaining Perfect Love 423
Mind and Matter

142

Miraculous Deliverance

187

PAGE

Moral Lessons

133

Nature and Properties of Perfect Love 336

Negro and his Master's Children 187

Not Slothful in Business

298
Old Charles Hall

14
Original Sin

297
Our Sabbath-Schools

176

Parallel between Moses and Christ 214

Parental Influence

186

Pipe and the Gospel

64

Poetry of the Bible

325

Power of Nature over the Human

Mind

414

Practical Effects of Christianity 95
Prayerless Family

185

Praying Mother

228

Problem, The

108
Providence of God Illustrated

147

Providential Station

66

Punctuality

222
Queries

69, 149
Replies to

97, 105, 263
Reflections on a Panoramic View of
Nanking

373
Remarks on Dr. Paley's Sermon on

“the General Resurrection" 456
Reminiscences of Mossley 344, 383, 466
Sacred Wells, The

60

Salvation through Christ

249

Sanctification

136

School-boy and his Father

267

Scripture Illustrated

269

Singular Conversion

226

The Thoughtless One Arrested 348

Thoughts on Reading

491
Treasure Hid in a Field -

140
Two Swearers Converted

145
Two Daughters

65
Unhappy condition of those who do
not possess Perfect Love

370
Vaudois Pastors

223

Visit to Lough Dearg 376, 407, 446

What would constitute a Revived

Ministry

55

Word in Season

68

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CHAPELS OPENED OR RE-OPENED.

A

Address to the Officers and Ministers

of the Methodist New Connexion
in the Dudley Circuit -

509

Ambler Thorn, Halifax Circuit 354

An Acknowledgment

398
Ballyclare Chapel, Ireland

238

Book-Room and Magazines, The 514

Boston Circuit and the Chapel Fund 78

Chapel Anniversary, Boston Circuit 478

Chapel Hymn-Books for Sunday-

Schools

35

Christian Union in Barnsley

197

Conference at Nottingham

239, 316

Conference at Belfast

237

Connexional Extension

158, 278

157

315

355

355

277

33

Armley

Oldham

Rich Hill

Thornley

Chapel Debts

Chapel Fund

LAYING FOUNDATION OF A NEW CHAPEL

IN THE

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Barnsley Circuit

at Etruria

at Higher Hurst

at Sunderland

396

438

194

396

PAGE
Liverpool Circuit

397
London Circuit

355
Magazines, The

508

Means of Circulating Sunday-Scholars'

Magazine

79

Meeting in Liverpool for the promo-
tion of Christian Union

510

336

MISSIONARY SERVICES AT

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Discourse on the Future Abode of
the Righteous

431
Dissenter's Plea for his Non-conformity 270
Doctrine of Original Sin

429
Domestic Bible

350
Education the Birth-right of every
Human Being

272
Egyptian, The

431
Elisha

431
England in the Seventeenth Century 310
Encyclical Letter

31
Entire Correspondence between the
Churches

140
Essays on Christian Union

29, 69
Family Choir

350
First Class Book

30
Foundation of Barkerism and Socin-
ianism Destroyed

31

Friendly Hints to Female Servants 503

Globes, Celestial and Terrestrial

392
Glory of the Redeemer

73
Gospel Preached to Babes

74
Guide to Acquaintance with God
Hebrew Primer

391
Historical Register

74
History of Ireland

349

History of Greece

29

Housemaid's Complete Guide and
Adviser

350
Important Inquiry, The

311

Incarnation of Christ

310

Infant School Spelling Book
Inquiry into the Organization and

Government of the Apostolic Church 152

152

74

PAGE

Jerusalem Sinner Saved -

432

Jessie Barton

74

Jubilee Services of the London Mis-
sionary Society

31
Juvenile Christian Remembrancer 432
Juvenile Missionary Keepsake 502
Kingdom of Christ not of this World 189
Kindness to Animals

30
Lads of the Factory

391

Law of Christ for Maintaining his

Church

153

Louis XIV. and his Cotemporaries 110

Manual of Phonography

351

Memoir of Mrs. Mundy

73

Memoir of the Life and Writings of
Thomas Cartwright

502
Memoir of the late Rev. Jno. Reid, M.A.502
Memoir of the Rev. T Batty

153

Memorial to bring to Remembrance 152

Memorials of Missionary Life in Nova
Scotia -

391

Minutes of the Anti-State-Church

Association

311

Mirror of the Gospel

271

Missionary Enterprises in Many Lands 111

Missionary's Reward

29

Mother's Practical Guide

72

Notes on Scripture Lessons

30

Occasional Sermons. By A. Scott 189, 351

Original State of Man and Human

Depravity -

350

People's Gallery of Engravings 271

Personality and Deity of the Holy

Spirit -

272

Phonography and Phonotypy

351
Portable Commentary

321

Proceedings of the Anti-Maynooth

Conference

311

Protestant Christianity Contrasted

with Romanism

311

Psalmist, The

430

Puseyism

270

Remarks on a Charge by Archdeacon

Hare

431

Religious Tradesman

152

Romanism of Italy

152

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29

429

36

469

96

127

455

302

MONTHLY RECORD.-38, 80, 150, 200, 280, 320.

THE METHODIST

NEW CONNEXION MAGAZINE.

JANUARY, 1845.

BIOGRAPHY.

MEMOIR OF THE REV. A. JACKSON,

BEING THE ACCOUNT WHICH WAS READ AT THE CLOSE OF HIS FUNERAL SERMON

PREACHED IN ZION CHAPEL, LONGTON, APRIL 28th, 1844.

BY THE REV. S. WOODHOUSE.

As our late respected friend has placed upon record a history of his early life and conversion to God, it will be most interesting to give a considerable extract from that document in his own language, as nearly as possible,—autobiography having charms and exciting an interest which cannot apply to the biography of a person entirely written by another. In the first case, the dead speaks; you hear, in a manner, the deceased as if living and talking to you.

“I was born,” says Mr. Jackson, “in Failsworth, near Manchester, in the county of Lancashire, May 1st, 1778. I can remember the Holy Spirit's operations upon my mind as long as I can remember anything. To what

age I had arrived when I first began to see the sinfulness of sin, I cannot exactly say; but I believe I was not more than six years old, if so much. As I

grew in years and stature, my inward wickedness strengthened, and I was more base in my conduct towards God and my parents, and used to wish I could sin without remorse, and wonder why I must not do as I pleased without being under the control of any one; and so opposed was my heart against the authority of God and my parents, that I sometimes burned with rage. I am witness that the carnal mind is enmity against God. My mind being thus depraved, I required to have some one over me that was capable of using such severities as were necessary to keep me in subjection. Such a one was my father. His corrections were both severe and frequent, by which means he kept me restrained from many sins, into which I should otherwise have run; for which corrections I have reason to thank God. Sometimes the people in the neighbourhood reflected upon my father for his

B

severity with me, and thought my conduct did not merit such sharp chastisement; but I did not think so; for I had such clear discoveries of the sinfulness of my conduct, that after a severe chastisement, I have sat down and wept, and said to myself, this is nothing in comparison of what I deserve. I am the worst child in the world; I wonder that either my parents or God will have anything to do with me.'

“When about the age of sixteen years, (up to which period it appears he had not heard a sermon, he says,) I one Sabbath-day heard a Methodist Preacher deliver a discourse not far from the place where I then resided. This sermon was the means of increasing my spiritual light respecting the nature of sin considerably, and some very deep impressions were made upon my heart, and again I formed a determination to become religious; but bad company and my wicked heart were too strong for my self-sufficiency, and I had no idea of asking help of God,—therefore I' again resumed my wicked course, and in this year became more vile than I had ever been before-time. Like my wicked companions, I could blaspheme, drink, and commit many abominations, to the no small grief of my parents, and to my own shame and disgrace. How to accomplish a reformation I knew not. It seemed impossible to be done while surrounded by so many wicked companions. I therefore determined to enlist as a soldier, and leave that part of the country. Accordingly, when little more than eighteen years of age, I hired myself into the fourth regiment of the Lancashire militia; and when about nineteen years old, left

my much injured father and mother to lament the absence of a son who had been a cause of almost incessant grief to them for many years. After removing from Morpeth, in Northumberland, to Tynemouth barracks, I daily grew more and more sensible of the sinfulness of sin, and yet was more and more captivated by it. While in this situation I went one Sabbath evening to hear a Methodist Preacher in North Shields chapel. I was much affected under his sermon, and also under another sermon preached in the same place the next evening, by Mr. Joseph Benson."

From this period, (April, 1799,) his convictions grew stronger, and his distress of mind became almost insupportable. One of his comrades, who knew something of religion, and saw our brother's situation, invited him again to attend the house of God, and encouraged him to pray. Hear his own account of commencing this practice:" How to perform this, to me, new duty, I did not know. First, it struck

my

mind I had better make use of a common prayer-book; but I thought that would never do, for being scarcely able to read any, I thought my attention would be so taken up with spelling the words, that it would be taken off from God, the true object of worship. So I laid aside the book, and kneeled down and prayed, saying, 'God be merciful unto me, the greatest of sinners, and teach me how to pray.' The Lord soon answered, and so enlarged my mind, that I could address him with great ease for whatever I wanted. After spending some time in prayer, I laid me down with more comfort than I had ever done before, for at least fourteen years; for though I had a deep sense of my sinfulness, I felt a very strong persuasion God would save me. For three weeks I prayed almost incessantly-read the Scriptures attentively, and abstained from every thing I knew to be evil, but did not find peace. At this I wondered; for I thought God was so kind, that if I did but seek his approbation aright, he would give me a sense thereof, and soon. I therefore con

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