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TO J. BARKER.

January 8, 1842. DEAR FRIEND, In a publication sent out by your opponents, S. Hulme, T. Allin and others, there is the following statement :

.“ One of our correspondents has sent us the following communication. The information it contains, he says, has come from two Independent Ministers in the North of England; and, he adds, you may rely upon its truth.'

“ JOSEPA BARKER has offered himself as a minister to the Independents, but ras been rejected by them."

Will you please to inform me and your readers, whether this tatement be true ?

Yours affectionately, J. T. Ans. It may or it may not be true that the authors of the publication to which you refer have received such a story from one of their correspondents, but as to the statement that I ever offered myself to the Ind-pendents, or that I was rejected, there is not a word of truth about it. It is a mere fabrication ; an unmixed falsehood, If my persecutors can produce the name of their Informer, and the names of the tivo Independent]Ministers” from whom it is said the information has come, letëthem make haste and do it : if they cannot, then let thein stand convicted as the fabricators of falsehood and of slander

before the whole world.

JOSEPH BARKER. P.S. I am wishful' to give my friends all the information on any matter of importance, that I can, but I do not like to be troubled with communications asking for explanations of statements made in the publication from which the above statement is taken. The olject, the spiri', and the whole character of the work might satisfy every one, without any explanation from me, that its statements are worthy of no credit whatever. I have however answered my friend's question on this occasion, that

my prosecutors might have a fair opportunity, if they speak truth, of proving the truth of their statements. It will be so easy for them now to name their correspondent, and the two Independent Ministers, if their statement be true: and it will be so manifest, if they do not produce the names of their informant and of the two Independent Ministers, that they have no regard to truth.

THE WEALTH QUESTION. Just published, and may be had of all the Agents for the Investigator, and (hy order of any Bookseller) of R. Groombridge, Paternoster Row, London, a New (the third) Edition of “THE RULE FOR CHRISTIAŃS as to THE POSSESSION and THE USE OF PROPERTY, a Sequel to the Essay on Covetousness, being an attempt to ascertain what is Taught by the Oracles of God on this Subject. By Thomas Smith.

[The Price of this Pamphlet was originally One Shilling, but to secure for it the most extensive Circulation possible, it is now sold for FourPunce, and when Quantities are purchased for Distribution, for considerably less still.] Revirus.—" An ably written Pamphlet.”Revivalist.

We recomiend' this we.l-written Pamphlet.”— Wesleyan Methodist Magazine.

" This is a learned Pamphlet, the production of one well versed in the Scriptures, which merits great attention."-Churchman.

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THE

CHRISTIAN INVESTIGATOR,

AND

EVANGELICAL REFORMER

;

For the Promotion of sound Religious Knowledge, and the Inculcation

of Temperance and Peace, and of the whole Religion of Christ.

No. 1.

JANUARY 22, 1842.

Vol. II.

TEMPERANCE

their advocate. I hope that all who AND TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES.

may read what I have to offer on I have frequently promised, that this subject, will be influenced by a if Providence should favour me with regard to the same great objects, and a suitable opportunity, I would en- then I shall have no anxiety as to deavour to lay my views on Temper- the results. ance and Temperance Societies be- The whole subject, as to the fore the public, in print. A suitable merits of the societies which I adopportunity appears now to be given, vocate, may be brought within a and events which have lately taken very narrow compass; it may be replace, appear to render it necessary duced to two simple questions; first, that I should endeavour to fulfil my whether the objects which we propromise without delay. Myself and pose to accomplish are good? and, ā number of others have thought it secondly, whether the means which our duty to withdraw from the old we propose to employ for the accommixed 'l'emperance Societies, and to plishment of those objects be good ? form ourselves into a New Society, If the objects at which we aim are to consist of such as we believe to be good, it is but right that you

should sincere Christians, and to be con- in some way or other, labour fir ducted on Christian principles. I their accomplishment; and if the would, therefore, embrace this op- means also which we portunity of laying my views on this employ for the accomplishment of subject before the world. I hope those objects are good, it is but right that all who may read what I have that we should all unite together in to offer, will give the subject their these societies, and work as one man, serious attention, and that they will These are the two questions, then, use their best endeavours to come to to which we would call your attena knowledge of the truth. It is my tion. We wish to show, in the first belief, that Christian Temperance place, that the objects at which we Societies for spreading the principle aim in forming ourselves into Temof abstinence from intoxicating perance Societies are truly good—that drinks, are calculated to do great they are objects which all men ought good ; that they are calculated to to desire to see accomplished ; and bring Glory to God in the Highest, we wish to show, in the second place, and to promote the welfare of my that the means also, which we prow fellow-men both in this world and in pose to employ, are right means, the world which is to come; and it is that they are, in fact, such as may the desire which I feel to assist in be consistently employed by the folpromoting these glorious objects, lowers of Jesus Christ. that induces me to stand forward as We would endeavour to show, in

pose to

the first place, that the objects which temple, and their family a little we have in view, in forming our church, and they themselves were as selves into Temperance Societies, are the prophet and the high priest in good. The first object which we their domestic circle. They read to are wishful to accomplish, is the re- their wives and their offspring the formation of drunkards; our second oracles of God, and while their beobject is, the preservation of those who loved ones kneeled around them, they are sober from becoming drunkards; offered up their daily prayers and and our last and principal object is, thanksgivings to the fountain of their to bring all men to embrace the reli- lives and of their blessings. And every gion of Christ, and to be happy in week, as the day of rest came rou the enjoyment of its blessings, both they walked in each other's company in this life and in the life which is to the house of prayer, and listened to come.

to the words of life, and prayed, and, The first object which we have in the hopes of one day reaching the in view, is the reformation of drunk- better land, and sharing with their ards. We wish to bring all the families and Christian friends the drunkards in our country, and all bliss of heaven, they frequently rethe drunkards in the world, to be joiced with joy unspeakable and full sober characters. That the reforma- of glory. These were delightful tion of drunkards is a desirable thing, days indeed : they were the days of will be acknowledged by all who heaven on earth. But they are have any regard to the interests of gone, alas, and in their place have their fellow-men. Even drunkards comé days of darkness, and guilt, themselves will acknowledge this; and misery. The man that was once they will acknowledge that it would rejoicing on the threshold of Heabe better, both for themselves and ven, is now sighing and groaning for their families, if they were truly at the gate of hell.

His home is reformed. Drunkards are not alto- cheerless and desolate ; his wife is gether without thought, nor are they sad and sorrowful; and his litaltogether without feeling either. - tle ones are some of them dying, They sometimes compare the days and escaping their wretchedness, and that are past, with the days that are others of them are growing up wild passing now; they think of what and neglected, in ignorance, and they were once, and of what they want, and profligacy: His clothing are now; and they cannot but ac- is filthy, his health is declining, his knowledge, to themselves, if to no one cupboard is empty, he is surrounded else, that it was far better with them with difficulties and troubles, and he when they walked in the ways of sees no prospect of relief. His soul Temperance, than it has ever been is a complete wreck. That breast since, and that it would be better for which was once the abode of peace, them now, if they were restored to and hope, and joy, is now the abode the paths of Temperance again.- of guilt, and fear, and torment. His Some of them recollect the time delightful intercourse with God and when they had comfortable home, with the eternal world is cut off; he a pleasing wife, and happy interest- cannot think of God without dread, ing children.

They recollect the and the eternal world presents no'time when their backs were well thing to his view but darkness and clothed, when their tables were well storms of wrath. Instead of joining spread, when their cupboards were with happy souls in singing the songs well stored. Some of them recollect of Zion, he is raving with his the time when they enjoyed the drunken companions, or, dejected blessings of religion. They once

They once and distracted, after his drunken rehad

peace of mind, and an assurance vel, he is cursing the day that he of God's approbation, and a de

was born. The children that he lightful and well-grounded hope of formerly was training for heaven, everlasting life. Their souls were he is now conducting to the regions full of love to God, and of love beneath, and his dwelling, which was to all mankind, and it was their meat once like a little heaven, is now beand their drink to labour in God's come a little hell. His friends, when cause, and to do good to their fel- they see him, look sadly on, and low-men. Their home was a little mourn over his awful fall : and an

some

gels, that once attended on his path himself, he knew that those who and ministered to his welfare with were temperate were better and hapjoy, now start aside, and reluctantly pier than himself. And Jack was give up their charge. Such is the not alone in his judgment; there tremendous change which drink has are thousands of drunkards of the made in his character and lot, and

same mind. such is the fearful contrast forced And I am sure that if drunkards on the drunkard's soul, when his themselves are prepared to acknowthoughtful moments he reflects on ledge that it would be well if they the days that are past.

And he were reformed, there will not be weeps at times, and would give found many sober people but what away a world if he had it, to will be ready enough to acknowledge bring back the blessedness of former that the reformation of drunkards days.

would be a good thing. The child All drunkards are not alike ; there will acknowledge that it would be a are infinite degrees in drunkenness, good thing if his drunken father and there are infinite varieties of were reformed ; and the wife will circumstances in which drunkards acknowledge that it would be a good are placed. It is not every drunk- thing if her drunken husband were ard that is reduced to rags and beg- reformed. Many wives and children gary ; nor is it every one that has know that if their husbands and fabanished from his dwelling all do- thers were sober, like some hus. mestic comfort.

There are bands and fathers, they might be drunkards who have still a plentiful better fed, and better clad, and escape table, and well-clothed backs, and many unpleasant things which bewho still maintain something like fal them now. Thousands of chilorder in their families. But all dren that are now obliged to spend drunkards are miserable, and most the day in weary and destructive drunkards are sensible of their mi- labours, might be spending their sery, and sensible, too, that it would days at school, receiving useful inbe a happy thing if they were re- struction, and gathering full strength claimed from their drunken propen- of soul and limb, if their parents sities, and restored to their former were sober. And thousands of wives, state of sobriety.

who are at present used like slaves, I was one day passing along the and who languish under the sorrows streets of Chester, near the Cross, of a broken heart, might live in and there was a drunken man pass- another paradise, if their husbands ing at the same time.

There was a were sober and religious. And I am number of loose men standing at sure the mother that has a drunken the Cross, talking with each other. son, would think his reformation a The drunken man that was passing, happy thing. The heaviest affliction was something of a wit, and I was that yonder aged woman ever had to known to be a temperance advocate; bear, was a drunken son. She has had and when the persons that were eleven children, and has reared them standing at the Cross saw him pass- all; she has had oppressive toil, ing by, they were anxious to get and weary journies; she has known him to play his wit upon me, and so what it was to suffer want, and to to divert themselves at my expense, endure unkindness : she has many and at the expense of the cause of times toiled hard by day, and temperance. As I drew near the watched through the long anxious Cross, they called to the poor reeling night, tending her suffering little drunkard, and said, “See thee, Jack; ones. She has buried her firstsee thee, Jack;" pointing at the same born, her best, her favourite child, time to me, wishing to set him on. just when he had reached the But Jack had more than years of manhood, and was promisthey thought he had. He looked ing fair to be a comfort and a honour first at them, and then at me, and to her : she has wept over the death when he saw what they were after, of an aged parent, and suffered many he said, “ Nay, nay ; I'm not so bad griefs which none but her own heart as that neither : he's better than ever fully understood. But none of me.” Though the poor creature had her sorrows, none of her trials, neinot virtue enough to be temperate ther want, nor weary toil, nor sleep

sense

а

the first place, that the objects which temple, and their family little we have in view, in forming our- church, and they themselves were as selves into Temperance Societies, are the prophet and the high priest in good. The first object which we their domestic circle. They read to are wishful to accomplish, is the re- their wives and their offspring the formation of drunkards; our second oracles of God, and while their beobject is, the preservation of those who loved ones kneeled around them, they are sober from becoming drunkards ; offered up their daily prayers and and our last and principal object is, thanksgivings to the fountain of their to bring all men to embrace the reli- lives and of their blessings. And every gion of Christ, and to be happy in week, as the day of rest came round, the enjoyment of its blessings, both they walked in each other's company in this life and in the life which is to the house of prayer, and listened to come.

to the words of life, and prayed, and, The first object which we have in the hopes of one day reaching the in view, is the reformation of drunk- better land, and sharing with their ards. We wish to bring all the families and Christian friends the drunkards in our country, and all bliss of heaven, they frequently rethe drunkards in the world, to be joiced with joy unspeakable and full sober characters. That the reforma- of glory. These were delightful tion of drunkards is a desirable thing, days indeed : they were the days of will be acknowledged by all who heaven on earth. But they are have any regard to the interests of gone, alas, and in their place have their fellow-men. Even drunkards come days of darkness, and guilt, themselves will acknowledge this; and misery. The man that was once they will acknowledge that it would rejoicing on the threshold of Heabe better, both for themselves and ven, is now sighing and groaning for their families, if they were truly at the gate of hell.

His home is reformed. Drunkards are not alto- cheerless and desolate ; his wife is gether without thought, nor are they sad and sorrowful; and his litaltogether without feeling either.- tle ones are some of them dying, They sometimes compare the days and escaping their wretchedness, and that are past, with the days that are others of them are growing up wild passing now; they think of what and neglected, in ignorance, and they were once, and of what they want, and profligacy: His clothing are now; and they cannot but ac- is filthy, his health is declining, his knowledge, to themselves, if to no one cupboard is empty, he is surrounded else, that it was far better with them with difficulties and troubles, and he when they walked in the ways of sees no prospect of relief. His soul Temperance, than it has ever been is a complete wreck. That breast since, and that it would be better for which was once the abode of peace,

if they were restored to and hope, and joy, is now the abode the paths of Temperance again.- of guilt, and fear, and torment. His Some of them recollect the time delightful intercourse with God and when they had a comfortable home, with the eternal world is cut off; he a pleasing wife, and happy interest- cannot think of God without dread, ing children.

They recollect the and the eternal world presents no“time when their backs were well thing to his view but darkness and clothed, when their tables were well storms of wrath. Instead of joining spread, when their cupboards were with happy souls in singing the songs well stored. Some of them recollect of Zion, he is raving with his the time when they enjoyed the drunken companions, or, dejected blessings of religion. They once and distracted, after his drunken rehad peace of mind, and an assurance vel, he is cursing the day that he of God's approbation, and a de

was born. The children that he lightful and well-grounded hope of formerly was training for heaven, everlasting life. Their souls were he is now conducting to the regions full of love to God, and of love beneath, and his dwelling, which was to all mankind, and it was their meat once like a little heaven, is now beand their drink to labour in God's come a little hell. His friends, when cause, and to do good to their fel- they see him, look sadly on, and low-men. Their home was a little mourn over his awful fall: and an

them now,

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