Reeves' History of the English Law, from the Time of the Romans to the End of the Reign of Elizabeth [1603]: With Numerous Notes, and an Introductory Dissertation on the Nature and Use of Legal History, the Rise and Progress of Our Laws, and the Influence of the Roman Law in the Formation of Our Own, Volume 2

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Page 349 - Leicester in the summons for a parliament at this time directed " the sheriffs to elect and return two knights for each county, two citizens for each city, and two burgesses for each borough in the county...
Page 413 - ... any false news or tales, whereby discord, or occasion of discord or slander, may grow between the King and his people, or the great men of the realm ; and he that doth so, shall be taken and kept in prison, until he hath brought him into the court, which was the first author of the tale.
Page 389 - ... prove that they were his, or perished in his keeping, within a year and a day, they shall be restored to him without delay •„ and if not, they shall remain to the king, and...
Page 18 - FIRST, we have granted to God, and by this our present Charter have confirmed for us and our heirs for ever, that the Church of England shall be free, and shall have all her whole rights and liberties inviolable. We have granted also, and given to all the freemen of our realm, for us and our heirs for ever...
Page 27 - The king to his Justices of the Bench greeting. Where of late it was provided that religious men should not enter into the fees of any without licence and will of the chief lord of whom such fees be holden immediately...
Page 44 - It will be observed that the words are " prteci [if de capite," which latter words, added in the third chapter of Henry III., implied that the land was held of the king in chief, or otherwise the suit should first be brought in the court of the lord of whom the land was held, and hence Lord Coke...
Page 47 - ... which the lord of the fee may say that he has jurisdiction. And when we return, or if we desist from our pilgrimage, we shall straightway exhibit full justice to those complaining with regard to these matters. 54. No one shall be taken or imprisoned on account of the appeal of a woman concerning the death of another than her husband. 55. All fines imposed by us unjustly and contrary to the law of the land, and all...
Page 413 - ... to tell or publish any false news or tales, whereby discord, or occasion of discord, or slander may grow between the king and his people, or the great men of the realm...
Page 386 - Statutum de tallagio non concedendo, that no tallage or aid shall be laid or levied by the king or his heirs in this realm, without the good will and assent of the archbishops, bishops, earls, barons, knights, burgesses, and other the freemen of the commonalty of this realm ; and by authority of parliament holden in the five and twentieth year of the reign of king Edward III.
Page 325 - ... and were wont in time of the king's noble progenitors, and also in his time; but took great revenges and distresses of their neighbours, and of other, until they had amends and fines at their own pleasure; and further, some of them would not be justified by the king's officers, nor would suffer them to make delivery of such distresses as they had taken of their own authority ": IT is PROVIDED, AGREED, AND GRANTED, that all persons, as well of high as of low estate, shall...

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