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To sweep from many an old romantic strain
That faith which no devotion may renew!
Why does this puny Church present to view 5
Her feeble columns? and that scanty chair!
This sword that one of our weak times might

wear!
Objects of false pretence, or meanly true!
If from a traveller's fortune I might claim
A palpable memorial of that day, 10

Then would I seek the Pyrenean Breach
That Roland clove with huge two-handed

sway, And to the enormous labour left his name, Where unremitting frosts the rocky crescent

bleach.

VIII.
IN THE CATHEDRAL AT COLOGNE.

0 Foe the help of Angels to complete
This Temple—Angels governed by a plan
Thus far pursued (how gloriously!) by Man,
Studious that He might not disdain the

seat Who dwells in heaven! But that aspiring

heat 5

Hath failed, and now, ye Powers! whose

gorgeous wings And splendid aspect yon emblazonings But faintly picture, 'twere an office meet For you, on these unfinished shafts to try The midnight virtues of your harmony:— 10 This vast design might tempt you to repeat Strains that call forth upon empyreal ground Immortal Fabrics, rising to the sound Of penetrating harps and voices sweet!

IX.
IN A CARRIAGE, UPON THE BANKS OF THE RHINE

Amid this dance of objects sadness steals
O'er the defrauded heart—while sweeping by,
As in a fit of Thespian jollity,
Beneath her vine-leaf crown the green Earth

reels:
Backward, in rapid evanescence, wheels 5

The venerable pageantry of Time,
Each beetling rampart, and each tower sublime,
And what the Dell unwillingly reveals
Of lurking cloistral arch, through trees espied
Near the bright River's edge. Yet why repine?
To muse, to creep, to halt at will, to gaze— 11
Such sweet way-faring—of life's spring the

pride,
Her summer's faithful joy—that still is mine,
And in fit measure cheers autumnal days.

HYMN,

FOB THE BOATMEN, AS THEY APPROACH THE
RAPIDS UNDER THE CASTLE OF HEIDELBERG.

Jesu! bless our slender Boat,
By the current swept along;

Loud its threatenings—let them not
Drown the music of a song

Breathed thy mercy to implore, 5

Where these troubled waters roar!

Saviour, for our warning, seen

Bleeding on that precious Rood;
If, while through the meadows green

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Gently wound the peaceful flood, 10

We forgot Thee, do not Thou
Disregard Thy Suppliants now!

Hither, like yon ancient Tower

Watching o'er the River's bed, Fling the shadow of thy power, 15

Else we sleep among the dead; Thou who trod'st the billowy sea, Shield us in our jeopardy!

Guide our Bark among the waves;

Through the rocks our passage smooth; z« Where the whirlpool frets and raves

Let Thy love its anger soothe: All our hope is placed in Thee; Miserere Domine !1

XI.
THE SOURCE OF THE DANUBE.

Not, like his great Compeers, indignantly
Doth Danube spring to life!2 The wandering

Stream
(Who loves the Cross, yet to the Crescent's

gleam Unfolds a willing breast) with infant glee Slips from his prison walls: and Fancy, free 5 To follow in his track of silver light, Mounts on rapt wing, and with a moment's

flight Hath reached the encincture of that gloomy sea Whose waves the Orphean lyre forbad to meet In conflict; whose rough winds forgot their

jars 10

1 See Note. "See Note.

To waft the heroic progeny of Greece;

When the first Ship sailed for the Golden

Fleece— Argo—exalted for that daring feat To fix in heaven her shape distinct with stars.

XII.

ON APPROACHING THE STAUB-BACH,

LAUTERBRUNNEN.

Uttered by whom, or how inspired—designed For what strange service, does this concert

reach Our ears, and near the dwellings of mankind! 'Mid fields familiarised to human speech ?— No Mermaids warble—to allay the wind 5

Driving some vessel toward a dangerous

beach— More thrilling melodies; Witch answering

Witch, To chaunt a love-spell, never intertwined Notes shrill and wild with art more musical: Alas! that from the lips of abject Want 10 Or Idleness in tatters mendicant The strain should flow—free Fancy to enthral, And with regret and useless pity haunt This bold, this bright, this sky-born, WaterPall !l

XIII.

THE FALL OF THE AAR—HANDEC.

From the fierce aspect of this Eiver, throwing His giant body o'er the steep rock's brink, Back in astonishment and fear we shrink:

1 See Note.

But, gradually a calmer look bestowing, Flowers we espy beside the torrent growing; 5 Mowers that peep forth from many a cleft and

chink, And, from the whirlwind of his anger, drink Hues ever fresh, in rocky fortress blowing: -They suck—from breath that, threatening to

destroy, Is more benignant than the dewy eve— 10

Beauty, and life, and motions as of joy:
Nor doubt but He to whom yon Pine-trees nod
Their heads in sign of worship, Nature's Grod,
These humbler adorations will receive.

xrv. MEMOEIAL.

NEAR THE OUTLET OF THE LAKE OF THUN.

"DEM

ANDENKEN

MEINES FREUNDES

ALOYS REDING

MDCCCXVIII."

Aloys Reding, it will be remembered, was CaptainGeneral of the Swiss forces, which, with a courage and perseverance worthy of the cause, opposed the flagitious and too successful attempt of Buonaparte to subjugate their country.

Abound a wild and woody hill
A gravelled pathway treading,
We reached a votive Stone that bears
The name of Aloys Eeding.

Well judged the Friend who placed it there 5
For silence and protection;

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