The British Chronologist: Comprehending Every Material Occurrence, Ecclesiastical, Civil, Or Military, Relative to England and Wales, from the Invasion of the Romans to the Present Time, Volume 3

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G. Kearsley, 1775 - Great Britain
 

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Page 252 - For defraying the charge for allowances to the feveral officers and private gentlemen of the two troops of horfe-guards, and regiment of horfe reduced, and to the fuperannuated gentlemen of the four troops of horfe-guards for I759 8 z.
Page 75 - Under Two Years of Age Between Two and Five Five and Ten Ten and Twenty...
Page 296 - Tavora and the Duke of Aveiro had their limbs broken alive : the duke, for greater ignominy, was brought bareheaded to the place of execution. The body and limbs of each of the criminals, after they were executed, were thrown upon a wheel and covered with a linen cloth. But when Antonio...
Page 60 - Colonies in America, and to prevent the Erection of any Mill or other Engine for slitting or rolling of Iron, or any plating Forge to work with a Tilt Hammer, or any Furnace for making Steel in any of the said Colonies...
Page 337 - The Lords of Manors, the Military and Civil officers, the Canadians as well in the Towns as in the country, the French settled, or trading, in the whole extent of the colony of Canada, and all other persons whatsoever, shall preserve the entire peaceable property and possession of...
Page 334 - Marquess de Vaudreuil to leave the town of Montreal before the • ; and no person shall be lodged in his house till he is gone. The Chevalier Levis, commander of the land forces ; the principal officers and majors of the land forces and of the colony troops, the engineers, officers of the artillery, and commissary of war, shall also remain at Montreal till the said day, and shall keep their lodgings there.
Page 237 - Every person in the fleet, who through cowardice, negligence, or disaffection, shall in time of action withdraw or keep back, or not come into the fight or engagement, or shall not do his utmost to take or destroy every ship which it shall be his duty to engage, and to assist and relieve...
Page 223 - ... for defraying the charge for allowances to the feveral officers and private gentlemen of the two troops of horfe guards, and regiment of horfe, reduced, and to the...
Page 323 - The court, on due consideration of the whole matter before them, is of opinion that lord George Sackville is guilty of having disobeyed the orders of prince Ferdinand of Brunswick...
Page 353 - An act for granting to his majesty several duties upon malt, and for raising the sum of eight millions by way of annuities and a lottery, to be charged on the said...

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