Watkin Tench's 1788

Front Cover
Text Publishing, Dec 4, 2011 - History - 320 pages
Watkin Tench sailed to Australia with the First Fleet in 1788. In his late twenties, a captain of the marines, he was insatiably curious about the new British colony of Australia. In his four years in the country, he wrote two books about the early settlement that were bestsellers in their day: A Narrative of the Expedition to Botany Bay (1789) and An Account of the Settlement at Port Jackson (1793). Both are included in full in this edition, lovingly edited by Tim Flannery.

Tench is the most readable of writers, and his books are fascinating for the vivid portraits they provide of early Australia. He introduces us to the iconic figures of Arthur Phillip and Bennelong, and provides fascinating descriptions of the infant colony. This popular edition of his two books should be read by every Australian.

Tench stands out amongst the storytellers of Australian history because of his lively and accessible writing, his ability to tell his tale with gusto and wit.

Tench will always remain the classic contemporary witness of our beginnings.' Les Murray
 

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About the author (2011)

Watkin Tench was born around 1758 in Chester, England. He joined the marine corps in 1776 and served in the American War of Independence before sailing to Botany Bay with the First Fleet. Tench returned to England in 1792. He stayed with the marine corps before retiring as a lieutenant-general in 1821. Watkin Tench died in 1833.

Born in Melbourne in 1956, Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist and explorer. He has written numerous books, including the award-winning bestsellers The Future Eaters, The Eternal Frontier and The Weather Makers. The 2007 Australian of the Year, Flannery is Panasonic Professor in Environmental Sustainability at Macquarie University, and is National Geographic's representative in Australasia. From 2007 to 2010 he chaired the Copenhagen Climate Council. Flannery lives on the Hawkesbury River in New South Wales.

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