King George's Middy

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Bell and Daldy, 1869 - 501 pages
 

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1869 / 501 pages / outer annexe VV

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Page 483 - ... saying that she would be answerable for their fees, as she was convinced her husband was in a. worse state than he imagined. Two days after this the doctors arrived. Although Hans at first showed great displeasure at their visit, they at last succeeded in persuading him to allow them to see his arm. The doctor who accompanied the surgeon, after examining it quietly, emphatically said to Hans — " Your life is in your own hands, my dear sir, and you can do what you please with it ; but, at the...
Page 472 - After some hours he began to think that the courier must now have left the village. As the cold of the night was intense, and his finger still pained him considerably, he resolved to try and find his way back. But the darkness prevented him from seeing any of the usual landmarks. At length he calculated that it must be near midnight, and he began to be greatly alarmed lest he should be obliged to pass the night in the forest But still he walked on, more, however, for the sake of maintaining warmth...
Page 309 - ... of his earlier monetary liabilities undertaken for the sake of his father's business. In the spring of 1856 he was nominated secretary to the Commission for examining scientific military schools on the Continent, and the duties of this office carried him to France and to Vienna. But his health now began to give way, and he was advised by his physicians to travel. After visits to Greece, Constantinople, the Pyrenees, and Italy, he was carried off at Florence by paralysis succeeding a malarial...
Page 465 - Müller, with his wife and two children. Hans was well to do in the world ; he was a stout, well-built fellow, fond of his family, and very industrious. But here ended the list of his good qualities. On the other side of the account we must set down the vice of intense selfishness, habitual discontent (although his circumstances were much better than those of his neighbours), and great indifference in religious matters. Honourable in his conduct, his integrity was not very disinterested. He knew...
Page 473 - ... or thirty paces round it. Though disappointed at not being nearer home, Hans approached the fire to warm himself. In a few moments, he looked round to see if any one was at hand of whom he could ask his way; but nobody was visible. He stood for some time warming himself, and at last resolved to stay by the fire till morning. He then began to look for wood to make up the fire, so that it should last till daybreak. Presently he perceived, near the trees, a quantity of fagots piled together. As...
Page 466 - Mullens worldly possessions consisted in a moderate-sized, well-stocked farm ; an inn, to which was attached a stable for post-horses ; and a farrier's shop. At this last, as it was the only one within a radius of five miles, he did a very respectable bit of work. Frau Miiller was stout and good-natured, industriously looking after her husband's affairs, and smoothing down the differences which not unfrequently arose between Hans and his neighbours. She also watched over the interests of the inn,...
Page 473 - ... have thrown himself down upon the ground. When almost in despair, he fancied he saw, through a break in the trees, the light of a distant fire. Believing himself to be near the village, he now set off in the direction of the light, and at last succeeded in reaching it. But he found that the rays did not proceed, as he had imagined, from the houses in the village, but from a fire which seemed about to go out It was in the centre of a small amphitheatre, which had been formed by the trees being...
Page 482 - Hans, feeling no pain, paid no attention to it, and treated the remonstrances of his wife on the subject with contempt. The inflammation soon extended up the arm, which swelled greatly. It was only when its swollen state became such that he found some difficulty in getting on his coat, that he thought of applying to a surgeon. The man of science, after carefully examining the arm, asked if he felt much pain in it. •' None whatever," said Hans. " That's certainly extraordinary,
Page 481 - ... store for him. Although the wounds on his cheek and right hand had healed, the whitlow on his finger, though trifling at first, had by continual abrasion become of a serious character. Inflammation extended up the palm of the hand, and matter was evidently forming in it. But Hans, feeling no pain, paid no attention to it, and treated the remonstrances of his wife on the subject with contempt. The inflammation soon extended up the arm, which swelled greatly. It was only when its swollen state...
Page 488 - ... felt no fatigue, the loss of that sense having been included in the gift he had received from the phantom. On seating himself in the inn, he remembered that he had used his hand. He glanced at it, and to his terror found that the slight, new-formed skin had been completely rubbed off by the blows he had given, and that it was evidently in a very inflamed condition. He called on Gretchen, who came to his assistance. With tears in her eyes — for which, by-the-bye, she was scolded by her husband,...

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