Symbols of Transformation

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Routledge, Dec 5, 2014 - Psychology - 664 pages
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In 1911 Jung published a book of which he says: '...it laid down a programme to be followed for the next few decades of my life.' It was vastly erudite and covered innumerable fields of study: psychiatry, psychoanalysis, ethnology and comparitive religion amongst others. In due course it became a standard work and was translated into French, Dutch and Italian as well as English, in which language it was given the well-known but somewhat misleading title of The Psychology of the Unconscious.

In the Foreword to the present revised edition which first appeared in 1956, Jung says: '...it was the explosion of all those psychic contents which could find no room, no breathing space, in the constricting atmosphere of Freudian psychology... It was an attempt, only partially successful, to create a wider setting for medical psychology and to bring the whole of the psychic phenomena within its purview.'

For this edition, appearing ten years after the first, bibliographical citations and entries have been revised in the light of subsequent publications in the Collected Works and in the standard edition of Freud's works, some translations have been substituted in quotations, and other essential corrections have been made, but there have been no changes of substance in the text.

 

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Contents

PART TWO
119
The Miller Fantasies
445
BIBLIOGRAPHY
463
Linguistic Abbreviations
496
INDEX
497
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Carl Gustav Jung was born in Switzerland on July 26, 1875. He originally set out to study archaeology, but switched to medicine and began practicing psychiatry in Basel after receiving his degree from the University of Basel in 1902. He became one of the most famous of modern psychologists and psychiatrists. Jung first met Sigmund Freud in 1907 when he became his foremost associate and disciple. The break came with the publication of Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious (1912), which did not follow Freud's theories of the libido and the unconscious. Jung eventually rejected Freud's system of psychoanalysis for his own "analytic psychology." This emphasizes present conflicts rather than those from childhood; it also takes into account the conflict arising from what Jung called the "collective unconscious"---evolutionary and cultural factors determining individual development. Jung invented the association word test and contributed the word complex to psychology, and first described the "introvert" and "extrovert" types. His interest in the human psyche, past and present, led him to study mythology, alchemy, oriental religions and philosophies, and traditional peoples. Later he became interested in parapsychology and the occult. He thought that unidentified flying objects (UFOs) might be a psychological projection of modern people's anxieties. He wrote several books including Studies in Word Association, Flying Saucers: A Modern Myth of Things Seen in the Skies, and Psychology and Alchemy. He died on June 6, 1961 after a short illness.

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