The Revolutionary War Era

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004 - History - 241 pages
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This volume in Greenwood's American Popular Culture through History series recreates the many ways in which a new American culture took root during the Revolutionary period. Tavern culture and pamphlet literature played integral parts in debates surrounding the Revolution. Newspapers spread information while printing the first advertisements. Courtship and marriage rituals varied greatly among the rich and poor, and among city and country folk. Public performance art was a hotly debated component of the increased schism between secular and religious concerns, though many Americans enjoyed recreations of recent military battles. Foodways were distinctly regional, yet food rationing was a universal hardship among army personnel. Randall Huff's narrative essays, as well as many extra front- and back-matter resources, help describe citizen's lives in the newly formed United States of America as the nation fought to win its independence.

American Popular Culture through History is the only reference series that presents a detailed, narrative discussion of United States popular culture. This volume is one of 17 in the series, each of which presents essays on Everyday America, The World of Youth, Advertising, Architecture, Fashion, Food, Leisure Activities, Literature, Music, Performing Arts, Travel, and Visual Arts.

 

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Contents

IV
3
V
29
VI
53
VII
73
VIII
87
IX
99
X
115
XI
129
XII
143
XIII
157
XIV
173
XV
195
XVI
211
XVII
215
XVIII
229
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About the author (2004)

RANDALL HUFF is Assistant Professor at Drake University.

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