The American Fistiana: Containing a History of Prize Fighting in the United States, with All the Principal Battles for the Last Forty Years, and a Full and Precise Account of All the Particulars of the Great $10,000 Match Between Sullivan and Hyer, with Their Method of Training for the Fight

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H. Johnson, 1849 - Boxing - 28 pages
 

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Page 14 - Turkey carpets, to have been expressly designed not to resemble anything in the heavens above, in the earth beneath, or in the waters under the earth.
Page 15 - That the ring shall be made on turf, and shall be four and twenty feet square, formed of eight stakes and ropes, the latter extending in double lines, the uppermost line being four feet from the ground, and the lower two feet from the ground. That in the centre of the ring a mark be formed, to be termed a scratch...
Page 15 - ... colors," and that the winner of the battle at its conclusion shall be entitled to their possession as the trophy of victory. 4. That two umpires shall be chosen by the seconds or backers to watch the progress of the battle and take exception to any breach of the rules hereafter stated. That a referee shall be chosen by the umpires, unless otherwise agreed on, to whom all disputes shall be referred...
Page 16 - That the seconds and bottle-holders shall not interfere, advise, or direct the adversary of their principal, and shall refrain from all offensive and irritating expressions, in all respects conducting themselves with order and decorum, and confine themselves to the diligent and careful discharge of their duties to their principals. 12. That in picking up their men, should the seconds or bottle-holders wilfully injure the antagonist of their principal, the latter shall be deemed to have forfeited...
Page 15 - ... be strictly enforced, to go to the funds of the Association. The principal to be responsible for every fine inflicted on his second. 8. That at the conclusion of the round, when one or both of the men shall be down, the seconds and bottle-holders shall step forward and carry or conduct their principal to his corner, there affording him the necessary assistance, and that no person whatever be permitted to interfere in this duty. 9. That on the expiration of thirty seconds the umpire appointed...
Page 15 - That the combatants, on shaking hands, shall retire until the seconds of each have tossed for choice of position, which adjusted, the winner shall choose his corner according to the state of the wind or sun, and conduct his man thereto ; the loser taking the opposite corner.
Page 16 - That no person on any pretence whatever shall be permitted to approach nearer the ring than ten feet, with the exception of the umpires and referee, and the persons appointed to take charge of the water or other refreshments for the combatants, who shall take their seats close to the corners selected by the seconds.
Page 16 - ... which purpose the umpires and the referee should be invariably close together. 26. That if in a rally at the ropes a man steps outside the ring to avoid his antagonist or to escape punishment, he shall for-feit the battle. 27. That the use of hard substances, such as stone or stick, or of resin in the hand during the battle shall be deemed foul, and that on the requisition of the seconds of either man, the accused shall open his hands for the examination of the referee. 28. That hugging on the...
Page 15 - ... rules hereafter stated. That a referee shall be chosen by the umpires, unless otherwise agreed on, to whom all disputes shall be referred ; and that the decision of this referee, whatever it may be, shall be final and strictly binding on all parties, whether as to the matter in dispute or the issue of the battle. That the umpires shall be provided with a watch for the purpose of calling time ; and...

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