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STEELE

No.

162. Duty of a Censor-How performed by

the Author Subscriptions for the Tatler ADDISON

163. Critical reading of Ned Softly's Poetry..

164. Remarks on the Author's various Corre-

spondents—Story of an old Soldier ....

165. On the Impertinence of Criticism-Cha-

racter of Sir Timothy Tittle .......... ADDISON

166. Rules of Visiting–Character of Tom

Modely-Notice of a Pastoral Masque,

&c. ...............................-
167. Funeral and Character of Mr. Betterton

the Actor ............................

168. Characters of Impudence and Abstirdity

-Education of the Jesuits-Petition of

Sarah Lovely .........................

169. On the Evils of Drinking-Character of

a Country Gentleman Letter from F.

Bickerstaff .......

170. Vicissitudes of human Life_Visit to the

Lottery Office-Advertisement of a

Heart lost................

171. Origin of Honour and Title-Behaviour

of the Indian Kings—Impertinence of

Minucio ........

172. Mischiefs arising from Passion-Story of

Mr. Eustace.........................
173. Errors in Education-Character of Ho-

race .............
174. Various Species of mad Persons-Lady

Fidget and Will Voluble, ......

175. On the Life of People of Condition....

176. On Heroism in Sufferings-Eucrates, the

goodnatured Man-Characters of Mar-

tius and Aristæus-Letter from an Idle

Man, and his Daughter ..............

377. On Dedications .......

178. On Don Quixote. The Upholsterer at

the Coffee-house ....

179. Letter on the Construction of a Green-

house..........
180. Injustice of not paying Tradesmen-Of

Show and Extravagance.....

181. On the Death of Friends Of the Au.

thor's Father--Sale of Wine.......... STEELE

182. Pleasures of the Theatre-Characters of

Wilks and Cibber ....................

183. Decay of Public Spirit-Character of

Regulus..............................
184. On Marriage, and the customary Cere.

monies-Impertinence of Wags ......

185. Cruelty of Parents thwarting the Incli-

nations of their Children in love-Story

of Antiochus and Stratonice..........

· 186. Characteristics of Vanity, Pride, and

Ambition-Correspondents' Neglect of

Postage ..............................
187. Pasquin of Rome, his Letters to the Au-

thor-Coffee-house Conversation...... -

188. Letter on a Green-house-From a Rus-

tic-Character of Desdemona-Of Bul.

lock and Penkethman ......

189. An Example of judicious Education-

Character of Sam. Bickerstaff and his.

Family ............
190. Party-writing-Answer to Pasquiu's Let-

ter-A Law Case Letter to the King

of France. ...........................

191. Mischief of making Vice commendable

-Character of Polypragmon-Lee's

Alexander..............................
192. Characters in a Stage-coach-Anecdote

of Two Ladies and their Husbands Pas-

sengers in a Packet-boat ............. ADDISON

193. The Author's Politics-Affairs of the

Stage--Letter from Downes the Promp-

ter .................................. STEELE

194. Passage from Spenser transprosed ......

195. Letter on the Author's Politics-Orders

to Quacks-Letter to Amanda.........

196. On the Behaviour of Patrons to their

Dependents.......

197. Account of Epistolæ obscurorum virorum

Passion for being thought a Scholar

198. History of Cælia.

THE

TATLER.

N° 145. TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1709-10.

Nescio quis teneros oculus mihi fascinat agnos.

Virg. Ecl, iii, 109. Ah! What ill eyes bewitch my tender lambs?

White's Chocolate-house, March 13, THIS evening was allotted for taking into con, sideration a laie request of two indulgent parents, touching the care of a young daughter, whom they design to send to a boarding-school, or keep at hoine, according to my delerinination; but I am diverted from that subject by letters which I have received from several ladies, complaining of a certain seçt of professed enemies to the repose of the fair sex, called Oglers. These are, it seems, gentlemen who look with deep attention on one object at the playa houses, and are ever staring all round Thein in churches. It is urged by my correspondeyts, that they do all that is possible to keep their eyes off these insnarers; but that, by whạt power they know not, both their diversions and devotions are interrupted by them in such a manner, as that they

VOL. IV.

cannot attend to either, without stealing looks at the persons whose eyes are fixed upon them. By this means, my petitioners say, they find themselves grow insensibly less offended, and in time enamoured of these their enemies. What is required of me on this occasion is, that as I love and study to preserve the better part of mankind, the females, I would give them some account of this dangerous way of assault; against which there is so little defence, that it lays ambush for the sight itself, and makes them seeingly, knowingly, willingly, and forcibly, go on to their own captivity.

This representation of the present state of affairs between the two sexes gave me very much alarm; and I had no more to do, but to recollect what I bad seen at any one assembly for some years last past, to be convinced of the truth and justice of this remonstrance. If there be not a stop put to this evil art, all the modes of address, and the elegant embellishments of life, which arise out of the noble passion of love, will of necessity decay. Who would be at the trouble of rhetoric, or study the bon mien, when his introduction is so much easier obtained by a sudden reverence in a down-cast look at the meeting the eye of a fair lady, and beginning again to ogle her as soon as she glances another way? I remember very well, wlien I was last at an opera, I could perceive the eyes of the whole audi. ence cast into particular cross angles one upon another, without any manner of regard to the stage, though king Latinus was himself present when I made that observation. It was then very pleasant to look into the hearts of the whole company; for the balls of sight are so formed, that one man's eyes are spectacles to another to read his heart with. The most ordinary beholder can take notice of any violept agitation in the mind, any pleasing transport,

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