The Philosophy of Cognitive-behavioural Therapy (CBT): Stoic Philosophy as Rational and Cognitive Psychotherapy

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Karnac Books, 2010 - Psychology - 288 pages
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Why should modern psychotherapists be interested in philosophy, especially ancient philosophy? Why should philosophers be interested in psychotherapy? There is a sense of mutual attraction between what are, today, two thoroughly distinct disciplines. However, arguably it was not always the case that they were distinct.

This book traces the origins of modern cognitive behavioral therapy, noting a clear analogy with ancient philosophy. Robertson skillfully combines the clinical experience of therapy and the academic grasp of philosophy to write in depth.
 

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Contents

PHILOSOPHY AND
1
CHAPTER
19
CHAPTER THREE
39
CHAPTER FIVE
73
CHAPTER
109
CHAPTER SEVEN
135
CHAPTER EIGHT
151
CHAPTER NINE
169
CHAPTER
193
CHAPTER ELEVEN
207
CHAPTER TWELVE
227
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
249
An example of Stoic therapeutic regime
267
INDEX
283
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About the author (2010)

Donald Robertson is a registered psychotherapist (UKCP/EAP) in private practice, specialising in clinical hypnosis and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). He has been working as a therapist since 1996, and is currently the principal of the UK College of Hypnosis & Hypnotherapy, a private training provider. Donald has published dozens of articles on hypnosis, philosophy, and psychotherapy in professional journals and periodicals. He is the author of 'Teach Yourself Resilience '(Hodder), 'The Philosophy of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy' (Karnac), and the editor of 'The Discovery of Hypnosis: The Complete Writings of James Braid, the Father of Hypnotherapy' (NCH). He regularly speaks at conferences and other events on issues such as hypnosis and philosophy in psychotherapy. Donald originally comes from Ayr, on the West coast of Scotland. He previously worked as a counsellor with young offenders, drug users, and schoolchildren, before opening his private practice in Harley Street, London. He studied Mental Philosophy at Aberdeen University before completing his Masters degree in Psychoanalytic Studies at the Centre for Psychotherapeutic Studies, Sheffield University. He holds a number of qualifications in different therapeutic approaches, including two practitioner diplomas in CBT, one from the Centre for Stress Management and the other from Kings College, London.

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