The Historiography of Islamic Egypt: (c. 950 - 1800)

Front Cover
Hugh N. Kennedy
BRILL, Jan 1, 2001 - History - 269 pages
History writing in Islamic Egypt was highly developed and no country in the Middle East has a richer or more developed tradition. This book is a collection of essays by leading scholars in the field, examining different authors, their works and the intellectual climate in which they flourished. Due prominence is given to the great historians of the Mamluk period (c.1260-1517) but also to the less well-known writers of the Ottoman period. The essays are also enlivened by insights into personalities and customs of the time. This book will be of interest to historians of the Islamic world in mediaeval and modern times, and to all those who are concerned with history writing as an intellectual discourse.
 

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Contents

AlMaqrīzī and Ibn Taghrī Birdī as Historians
9
Egypt and Aleppo in Ibn alAdīms Bughyat altalab
13
The Bahri Mamluk period 12501390
23
Baybars alManşūrīs Zubdat alFikra
37
Alī alBaghdādī and the Joy of Mamluk Sex
45
Representing the Mamluks in Mamluk Historical
59
AlMaqrīzī d 1442 and His World
77
Contemporary Events
107
AlMaqrīzī the Master and Abū Hāmid alQudsī
149
Disruptive Others as Depicted in
167
The Historiography of Ottoman Egypt 15171798
195
The EgyptianYemeni Symbiosis as Reflected
211
AlJabartīs Ajāib alathār fi alTarājim walakhbār and
221
History
237
Postscript
251
Index
263

Historians of the Circassian Mamluk Period 13821517
121

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About the author (2001)

Hugh Kennedy is Professor of Middle Eastern History at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and has published extensively on the Islamic World in the Middle Ages, including "The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates" (London, 1986) and "Muslim Spain and Portugal: a political history of al-Andalus" (London, 1996).