The poetical works of John Milton, illustr. by F. Gilbert

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Page 45 - Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years: And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth: and it was so. And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also.
Page 2 - He with his thunder, and till then who knew The force of those dire arms? Yet not for those, Nor what the potent Victor in his rage Can else inflict do I repent or change...
Page 125 - Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail, bounteous May, that dost inspire Mirth, and youth, and warm desire ; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
Page 72 - With what to sight or smell was sweet ! from thee How shall I part, and whither wander down Into a lower world ; to this obscure And wild ? how shall we breathe in other air Less pure, accustom'd to immortal fruits ? Whom thus the Angel interrupted mild.
Page 128 - Lycidas? For neither were ye playing on the steep Where your old bards, the famous druids, lie, Nor on the shaggy top of Mona high, Nor yet where Deva spreads her wizard stream. Ay me, I fondly dream, Had ye been there!— for what could that have done?
Page 24 - What thou seest, What there thou seest fair creature is thyself, With thee it came and goes...
Page 2 - Extort from me. To bow and sue for grace With suppliant knee, and deify his power Who from the terror of this arm so late Doubted his empire ; that were low indeed, That were an ignominy...
Page 23 - Ah ! gentle pair, ye little think how nigh Your change approaches, when all these delights Will vanish, and deliver ye to woe ; More woe, the more your taste is now of joy...
Page 11 - As when far off at sea a fleet descried Hangs in the clouds, by equinoctial winds Close sailing from Bengala, or the isles Of Ternate and Tidore...
Page 45 - With borders long the rivers: that Earth now Seem'd like to Heaven a seat where gods might dwell Or wander with delight, and love to haunt Her sacred shades...

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