The Lives of the Speakers of the House of Commons, from the Time of King Edward III to Queen Victoria

Front Cover
G. Willis, 1851 - Great Britain - 496 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 267 - Neither from my person nor my nature doth this choice arise : for he that supplieth this place ought to be a man big and comely, stately and well spoken, his voice great, his carriage majestical, his nature haughty, and his purse plentiful and heavy : but, contrarily, the stature of my body is small, myself not so well spoken, my voice low, my carriage lawyerlike, and of the common fashion, my nature soft and bashful, my purse thin, light, and never yet plentiful.
Page 390 - That jurors ought to be duly impanelled and returned and jurors which pass upon men in trials for high treason ought to be freeholders. That all grants and promises of fines and forfeitures of particular persons before conviction are illegal and void.
Page 390 - That King James II., having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between king and people ; and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Page 290 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament, are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England : " And that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the king, state, and defence of the realm, and of the Church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances, which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament : (c) Prothero, 311.
Page 48 - To lead out many to the Holy Land; Lest rest, and lying still, might make them look Too near unto my state. Therefore, my Harry, Be it thy course, to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels; that action, hence borne out, May waste the memory of the former days.
Page 302 - Brought all the' endowments of Achitophel. Sincere was Amri, and not only knew, But Israel's sanctions into practice drew ; Our laws, that did a boundless ocean seem, Were coasted all, and fathom'd all by him : No Rabbin speaks like him their mystic sense So just, and with such charms of eloquence ; To whom the double blessing does belong, With Moses
Page 290 - House itself), for or concerning any bill, speaking, reasoning, or declaring of any matter or matters touching the parliament or parliament business ; and that, if any of the said members be complained of and questioned for...
Page 290 - England; and that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the King, State and defence of the realm, and of the Church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances, which daily happen within this realm, are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in Parliament; and that in the handling and proceeding of those businesses every member of the House of Parliament hath, and of right ought to have, freedom of speech to propound, treat, reason and...
Page 390 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed; nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Page 290 - The Commons now assembled in Parliament, being justly occasioned thereunto concerning sundry Liberties, Franchises, and Privileges of Parliament, amongst others here mentioned, do make this Protestation following. That the Liberties, Franchises, Privileges, and Jurisdictions of Parliament. are the ancient and undoubted Birth-right and Inheritance of the Subjects of England ; and that the arduous and urgent Affairs concerning the King, State, and Defence...

Bibliographic information