On Principles and Methods in Latin Syntax

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C. Scribner's sons, 1902 - Latin language - 232 pages
 

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Page 53 - Grundriss, or in Lindsay's Latin Language, where large masses of facts which defy classification are brought together, furnishes convincing evidence that irregularity and absence of system are not merely occasional, but are the fundamental characteristics of Latin form-building." When Latin became a literary language in the third century BC, its case system was already withering away. The old instrumental, if it ever had a use, had merged with the ablative, when the latter was coalescing with the...
Page 102 - It is at once the indication and the result of a clearer feeling of concept-relation. Inflection in the main rather suggests than expresses relations; it is certainly not correct to say that in every case the expression of relation by a single word, eg, a preposition, is clearer than the suggestion of the same relation by a case-form, but it is correct to say that the relation can become associated with a single word only when it is felt with a considerable degree of clearness. The relation between...
Page 52 - For the purposes of teaching, the grammars very properly emphasise as much as possible such measure of system as Latin inflection permits, producing at the beginning of one's acquaintance with Latin the impression of a series of graded forms and meanings covering most accurately and completely the whole range of expression. But it is obvious that this is a false impression, and so far as we retain it, we are building upon a wrong foundation. Neither the forms nor the meanings are systematic. . ....
Page 116 - ... sagte den Soldaten, dass sie weggehen sollten. Es ist eine durch die Natur der Sache gegebene und durch die Resultate der Sprachforschung bestätigte Thatsache, dass aus dem einfachen Satze durch Anfügung eben eines solchen sich zunächst die Beiordnung ergab, und dass erst mit der fortschreitenden Entwicklung der Sprache sich aus der Beiordnung die Unterordnung herausbildete, indem die eine der Handlungen als die bedeutendere (Hauptsatz), die andere als die unbedeutendere (Nebensatz) empfunden...
Page 116 - Gang mitgemacht, den uns folgende Reihen veranschaulichen: 1. Die Sonne scheint. — Wir wollen spazieren gehen. 2. Die Sonne scheint; wir wollen spazieren gehen. 3. Die Sonne scheint, deshalb wollen wir spazieren gehen. 4. Weil die Sonne scheint, deshalb wollen wir spazieren gehen; und 1. Ich höre: du bist krank; 2. ich höre das: du bist krank; 3. ich höre, dass du krank bist; und 1. Er sagte den Soldaten: gehet weg; 2. er sagte den Soldaten, sie sollten weggehen; 3. er sagte den Soldaten, dass...
Page 140 - Ein rein parataktisches verhältniss zwischen zwei sätzen in dem sinne, dass keiner den andern bestimmt, gibt es also nicht; es ist kein anderer begriff von parataxe möglich als der, dass nicht einseitig ein satz den andern, sondern beide sich gegenseitig bestimmen.
Page 52 - The impression of system comes, no doubt, from the way in which we learn the facts of inflection. For the purposes of teaching, the grammars very properly emphasise as much as possible such measure of system as Latin inflection permits, producing at the beginning of one's acquaintance with Latin the impression of a series of graded forms and meanings covering most accurately and completely the whole range of expression. But it is obvious that this is...
Page 141 - In order to exhibit parataxis, the two sentences assumed to have the paratactic relation must each be capable of possessing an independent value. Just so soon as one of the two clauses is not capable of functioning alone, but only in conjunction with its neighbor, we have subordination or hypotaxis.

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