Notes and Emendations to the Text of Shakespeare's Plays: From Early Ms. Corr. in a Copy of the Folio, 1632

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Whittaker & Company, 1853 - 528 pages

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Page 171 - If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die. — That strain again ! — it had a dying fall : O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, (') That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour ! — Enough ; no more : 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Page 439 - You cannot call it love; for at your age The heyday in the blood is tame, it's humble, And waits upon the judgment; and what judgment Would step from this to this?
Page 423 - I conjure you, by that which you profess, (Howe'er you come to know it,) answer me : Though you untie the winds, and let them fight Against the churches ; though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up; Though bladed corn be lodg'd, and trees blown down; Though castles topple on their warders...
Page 431 - Almost to jelly with the act of fear, Stand dumb and speak not to him. This to me In dreadful secrecy impart they did, And I with them the third night kept the watch ; Where, as they had deliver'd, both in time, Form of the thing, each word made true and good, The apparition comes.
Page 256 - A made a finer end, and went away, an it had been any christom child; 'a parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets, and play with flowers, and smile upon his fingers...
Page 2 - With those that I saw suffer: a brave vessel, Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her, Dash'd all to pieces.
Page 448 - Why have my sisters husbands, if they say They love you all ? Haply, when I shall wed, That lord whose hand must take my plight shall carry Half my love with him, half my care and duty : Sure I shall never marry like my sisters, To love my father all.
Page 343 - There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks ; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body. O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue, That give a coasting welcome ere it comes. And wide unclasp the tables of their thoughts To every ticklish reader ! set them down For sluttish spoils of opportunity, And daughters of the game. [Trumpet within. All. The Trojans
Page xxvii - Like the poor cat i' the adage? MACB. Prithee, peace. I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. LADY M. What beast was't, then, That made you break this enterprise to me? When you durst do it, then you were a man; And, to be more than what you were, you would Be so much more the man. Nor time nor place Did then adhere, and yet you would make both. They have made themselves, and that their fitness now Does unmake you.
Page 445 - Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince ; And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest ! Why does the drum come hither ? [March within.

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