The history of modern Europe: with a view of the progress of society from the rise of the modern kingdoms to the Peace of Paris in 1763, Volume 3

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Harper & Brothers, 1841 - Europe
 

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Contents

Review of the Portuguese government commerce
66
General Burgoyne attacks and captures Valencia
68
Administration of the duke de Cholseul
72
His deference to England
78
Jealousy of the dntchessof Gram mom
85
Extent of the Spanish territory in the peninsula
90
Reflections on the society of the jesuits
96
Who issues a bull for the dissolution of
102
Electorate of Mayence populationrevenuesc
108
Congress enconragedand the colonists declare
124
Lord Chathams memorable opposition to this In Other outrages committed Newgate prison
130
The adtlttUFf must be a Protestant 103 J Return of the British
131
His death and funeral e 123 Also the fleet and kings benchthirty fires seen
136
The military fire upon the mobnumber of lives He falls in with the detachment under La Fay
138
He accepts the ner eonstjtutioa and pledgee himsel
140
Lord Comwallis pursues general Greene who re ture it
144
Lord Comwallis retreats from Wilmington to 138 dies 149 Naval exploits in the British channel
150
Loss of Rodneys prizei in a hurricane 150 He once more convokes tlte notables ib2
163
State of France at the accession of Louis XVI 156 The national assembly repair to the tennis
169
The prisons of the Abb aye are forced and the pri
171
The besiegers take possession of the bastille and
177
Something of them must accompany all revolu
183
The court avails itself of these agitations
189
TV French Revolution continuedConsequence
192
Speech of Louts on dissolving the constituent
195
Correspondence of the count dArtois
199
The national assembly complete the reorganization
205
The national assembly terminates its labours
211
Remarks on the constitution of 1701
212
Conduct of the monarch in these instances
218
FBOM THE TREATY OF IN 1802 TO THE DEATH OF ALEXAKD1
220
Ttw empire proclaimed at St Cloud 18th of May Prepares to attack the fortress of Vim which sur
222
Disastrous outsetthe troops under Dillon are
224
Petion is deposed and restored 930
230
Consternation of the king and his council
234
The Russian ambassador at the Porte arrested
236
The executive council at a loss for generals
240
Robespierre asks a delay of eight days to prepare
247
The Girondists dread the charge of royaliem
253
He prepares himself for death
254
Parliamentary discussions on the debts of the nabob
260
His first achievements on joining the army
319
Victory decides in favour of tlie convention
322
The king of SardiniasFituation described
346
LETTER XXIX
358
Napoleons conduct compared with the duke7f Buonaparte permits his advance that himself
370
He marches against Buonaparte and to relieve Austria assembles two armies on the Italian fron
376
The Jat Arcola and retreats to Ron Napoleon blames the directory for breaking off tlie
388
Their favourable tenor honourable to Buona Tyrol 34
395
Embarrassing condition of Great Britain 402 He finds the French fleet there and determines
413
Where be continue two months deliberating
417
British expedition to Egypt under sir R Aber
423
They call upon him to take the oath which he de nua
450
He leaves Paris Hay the 6th 1000 and arrives at Melas exhausted retires from the field
456
LETTER I
458
Napoleon continues his encroachments on neutral countries
470
Commanding influence of Touissaint 464 Insurrection in Irelanddeath of lord Kilwar
476
Hu holinesss obsequious letter of compliance 4rt0 quarters at Lints
480
Negotiations between France and Russia 481 Peace of Presburg 26th of December 1805 400
490
England fortifies her Marlello lowers
496
Sir Home Popham and general Beresford defeat
502
New arrangements in the cabinet
508
And on the late negotiations with France
515
The British march to Rosetta which they take but Manner of introducing the French armies into
527
A British expedition lands in Egypt
530
A British fleet convoys them to South America 524 Napoleon orders an assault on the suburbs
533
The emperors resolve on making Sweden exclude
534
The battle renewedmanceu vrings of the armies
540
Mr Perceval attempts to bring in lords Grey
546
Soull evacuates Oporto and retreats into Galli The latter takes potwesdion of
551
Difference between Cuesta and lord Welling Points touched upon in the kings speech
560
He is dissatisfied with the conduct of his brother Questionable conduct of the junta
566
The French army in possession of Madrid 526
568
Duke of Dalmatia takes possession of Badajoa
572
He Is defeated by lord Castlereagh
578
LETTER XV
584
Introductory observations
588
The conflagration of Moscow compels him to think
594
They enter and burn the city
610
Sir Niel Campbell appointed by England to attend
616
LETTER XX
624
Commencement of the battle at noon of the Ibth
630

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Page 505 - With more than mortal powers endow'd, How high they soar'd above the crowd ! Theirs was no common party race, Jostling by dark intrigue for place ; Like fabled Gods, their mighty war Shook realms and nations in its jar ; Beneath each banner proud to stand, Look'd up the noblest of the land, Till through the British world were known The names of PITT and Fox alone.
Page 260 - In him were united a most logical head with a most fertile imagination, which gave him an extraordinary advantage in arguing: for he could reason close or wide, as he saw best for the moment.
Page 505 - O'er PITT'S the mournful requiem sound, And Fox's shall the notes rebound. The solemn echo seems to cry, 'Here let their discord with them die.
Page 123 - In God's name, if it is absolutely necessary to declare either for peace or war, and the former cannot be preserved with honour, why is not the latter commenced without hesitation ? I am not, I confess, well informed of the resources of this kingdom ; but I trust it has still sufficient to maintain its just rights, though I know them not. — But, my Lords, any state is better than despair. Let us at least make one effort; and if we must fall, let us fall like men...
Page 577 - With this evidence of hostile inflexibility in trampling on rights which no independent nation can relinquish, Congress will feel the duty of putting the United States into an armor and an attitude demanded by the crisis, and corresponding with the national spirit and expectations.
Page 468 - ... gain, since sooner or later Egypt would belong to France, either by the falling to pieces of the Turkish Empire, or by some arrangement with the Porte.
Page 123 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy...
Page 260 - ... usury of twelve per cent to the first overgrown principal; and has again grafted on this meliorated stock a perpetual annuity of six per cent, to take place from the year 1781. Let no man hereafter talk of the decaying energies of Nature. All the acts and monuments in the records of peculation, the consolidated corruption of ages, the patterns of exemplary plunder in the heroic times of Roman iniquity, never equalled the gigantic corruption of this single act. Never did Nero, in all the insolent...
Page 113 - American forces ; on presenting it, congress unanimously adopted this resolution : " that they would maintain and assist him, and adhere to him with their lives and fortunes in the cause of American liberty.
Page 259 - But his superiority over other learned men consisted chiefly in what may be called the art of thinking, the art of using his mind, a certain continual power of seizing the useful substance of all that he knew and exhibiting it in a clear and forcible manner ; so that knowledge which we often see to be no better than lumber in men of dull understanding was in him true, evident, and actual wisdom.

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